Honey vs Sugar

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle

Honey vs Sugar

I have made a conscious decision to stop consuming sugar as much as I can.  With all the sugar in processed foods, I know I am better off avoiding it, as much as possible if not all together. But what about honey?

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


Honey vs Sugar – Which Is Better For You

by David Proctor

UFL Facebook Messenger Channel https://m.me/UrbanFarmLifestyle


September 20, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


I am a beekeeper and I love honey.  Should I feel guilty about still consuming honey while trying to avoid sweets? A little yes and a little no.

Sugar Molecule

Sugar Molecule

First let’s decide why or why not to consume sugar.  Since almost everything you buy to eat in the store or restaurant has sugar in it, do we want to consume more?
 
It is not that the food is bad per say, but that so much of our food that we eat and drink is heavily loaded with sugar, our bodies just can’t handle it.

Chart 1
Honey vs Sugar_Macros

We have so many cases of diabetes, obesity and other medical problems that arise from this overconsumption of sugar that in my opinion I should try and get away from adding sugar or eating additional sugary food.  The health risk is just too great.
 
In a strict comparison between honey and sugar, honey contains less fructose and glucose when we do a comparison to sugar, yet honey has more calories.
 
Processed sugar is higher on the glycemic index than honey.  This means that blood sugar levels can rise more quickly. 
Sugar starts out as a natural product.  Most of our fruits have natural sugar in them.  The problem arises when one tries to eat a balanced diet with fruit, we end up with too much sugar in our system.
 
When our bodies are overloaded with sugar and the effects from sugar, we end up with severe short term and long-term health problems.  Does honey do any better?
 
Honey still has an effect on our body, to some degree like sugar.  Too much consumption can cause health issues.  The good thing about honey, is that honey has beneficial effects more so than sugar.

Vitamins Honey vs Sugar
Vitamins Honey vs Sugar_Micro

The problem with honey is that not all honey is the same.  I prefer honey over sugar, even if it is just off the shelf in the store.  But processed honey has lost a lot of its natural benefits.  Plus, honey off the shelf can be diluted with fructose or corn syrup.
 
Processed honey is heated, so it will have a longer shelf life without crystallization.  It is also filtered so it looks nice and uniform.  You can still eat honey that has crystallized, I do all the time.

Minerals Honey vs Sugar
Minerals Honey vs Sugar_Micro

The nice-looking honey is what most consumers want, and they may not realize that they are buying a product that is not as good for them as it could be.
 
This brings us to what I consider the best type of honey, raw honey.  This type of honey has many health benefits even over regular shelf honey and definitely over sugar.

Honey vs Raw Honey
Honey vs Raw Honey

You can find honey labeled raw on the shelf along with the other honey products, but this will be heated and filtered.  The best way to get the most wholesome honey is to buy it from a local bee keeper.
 
You will see pollen in the honey and maybe even a bee wing or two.  But all the enzymes and nutritional benefits will be in that jar.
 
Remember, you always get what you settle for. 
 
If you want to buy cheap sugar and cheap honey, that is fine.  Remember most processed food and drink is loaded with high fructose corn syrup which is definitely not good for you.  Combined with your choice of additional sweeteners, health benefits might be minimal.
 
If you want to follow a healthier route you might have to spend a little bit more up front to get the short- and long-term health benefits. 

Your body, your choice!
 

Check It Out!

 

Natural Cures
Published on Feb 8, 2017 3:14


Quick Tip

Substituting Honey For Sugar
Substituting Honey For Sugar


Bibliography:

“10 Reasons Why Sugar Is Bad for Your Body.” Atkins, www.atkins.com/how-it-works/library/articles/10-ways-sugar-harms-your-health.

“3 Things You Need to Know About Raw Honey (Buying Tips).” Benefits-of-Honey.com, www.benefits-of-honey.com/raw-honey.html.

“About Us | United States | Burnley Farm Apiary, LLC.” Honey For Sale | United States | Burnley Farm Apiary, LLC, www.burnleyfarmapiary.com/about-us.

“Honey Vs Sugar: A Comparison.” BuzzAboutBees.net, www.buzzaboutbees.net/honey-vs-sugar.html.

“Raw Honey vs Sugar.” Neighborhood Hive, www.neighborhoodhive.com/pages/honey-vs-sugar.

“What Is Sugar?” The Sugar Association, www.sugar.org/sugar/what-is-sugar/.



 

Posted in Apiary, Health, Magazine Issues Tagged with:

Fluoride in Drinking Water

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle

Fluoride in Drinking Water

Some believe that adding fluoride to the water to prevent tooth decay is great, while others are not so happy about the idea.

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


Fluoride in Drinking Water

by David Proctor

UFL Facebook Messenger Channel https://m.me/UrbanFarmLifestyle


September 13, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) named water fluoridation as one of the ten great public health achievements of the 20th century.
 
This all started back in the mid 40’s when Grand Rapids, Michigan was the first city in the U.S. to fluoridate its water.  They found that by the early 1950’s, the results were clear: Compared to school children from nearby areas that did not fluoridate their water, children in Grand Rapids had fewer cavities.

Water
Water

Before this event no municipalities fluoridated their water, afterwards almost all did.

Almost all water contains some naturally-occurring fluoride, but usually at levels too low to prevent tooth decay.

Water fluoridation is the process of adding a small amount of fluoride to public water supplies to a level known to make teeth stronger and prevent cavities.
 
What has brought about some concern to this practice is that we now have toothpaste with fluoride. If some fluoride is good, is more better?

Apparently too much fluoride can have some adverse health consequences.  The bones tend to absorb fluoride leading to osteosarcomas (bone tumors).  The National Cancer Institute says that “researchers found no indication of increase cancer risk associated with fluoridated drinking water”

The most notable effect of too much fluoride is a condition called fluorosis.  Small white specks on the teeth.  This is not supposed to cause pain.  So, if you swallow too much toothpaste will this cause fluorosis? The American Dental Association recommends fluoride toothpaste and states that dental fluorosis does not harm the teeth or your health.
 
What about mothers that don’t breast feed and mix formula with tap water? The ADA still recommends the fluoridated water.

Boiling Water
Boiling Water

What about other countries that don’t fluoridate their water, yet have seen decreases in cavities and tooth decay.  The most common reply is that they get fluoride through other sources such as milk or salt.
 
Maybe adding fluoride to the water is not such a bad idea!  I personally have to wonder if this is the best method to medicate the public population.  I am not passing judgement for or against.  But you have to wonder whose best interest is at stake here?
 
I am not writing a conspiracy theory, just that it would be nice to have a choice rather than a “one dose fits all”.

With that being said, there are ways to remove or avoid fluoride from the water if you are so inclined.

Water Filters: You have to use reverse osmosis, deionizers, or activated alumina filters.  Activated carbon filters will not work.
Drink spring water or distilled water. 

These are the main ways to circumvent drinking fluoride water from your public water supply.

Avoid Fluoride Exposure
Avoid Fluoride Exposure

So, one way or the other drink up. 

They say you should drink eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day, with or without fluoride?

 

 

Why The Government Puts fluoride In our Water 3:13
Seeker
Published on Feb 19, 2015


Check It Out!

Fluoridation

Fluoridation


Quick Tip

 

Fluoride Cleansing Herbs
Fluoride Cleansing Herbs


Bibliography:

National Research Council, Subcommittee on Health Effects of Ingested Fluoride. Carcinogenicity of fluoride. In: Health Effects of Ingested Fluoride. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1993.

Top Ten Reasons to Oppose Water Fluoridatioon
https://iaomt.org/top-ten-reasons-oppose-water-fluoridation/

W. (2018, May 07). Top Ten Reasons to Oppose Water Fluoridation. Retrieved from https://iaomt.org/top-ten-reasons-oppose-water-fluoridation/

Campaign For Dental Health life is better With Teeth/ Fluoride Myths & Facts

Fluoride Myths & Facts

Fluoride Myths & Facts | Campaign for Dental Health. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://ilikemyteeth.org/fluoridation/fluoride-myths-facts/5/

National Cancer Institute
Fluoridated Water
https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/myths/fluoridated-water-fact-sheet

Fluoridated Water. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/myths/fluoridated-water-fact-sheet

Water Fluoridation

Water Fluoridation

(n.d.). Retrieved from https://fluoridealert.org/issues/water/

WaterCanada
Four Myths about Water Fluoridationa and Why Ther’re Wrong
By Water Canada 08:39AM July 25, 2017

Four Myths about Water Fluoridation and Why They’re Wrong

Four Myths about Water Fluoridation and Why They’re Wrong. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.watercanada.net/feature/four-myths-about-water-fluoridation-and-why-theyre-wrong/

TOP 10 WAYS TO REDUCE FLUORIDE EXPOSURE
Fluoride Action Network | August 2012

Top 10 Ways to Reduce Fluoride Exposure

(n.d.). Retrieved from https://fluoridealert.org/content/top_ten/



Posted in Health, Magazine Issues Tagged with: , , , , , ,

Preserving The Summer

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle

 

Preserving The Summer

This has not been an easy year for gardening.  With the growing season coming to an end, it is time to consider your options for preserving what the summer garden has provided.  Laurie Calloway will share her experience with freezing, dehydrating and canning. A bonus will be a recipe on making jams.

 

David Proctor

 

 
  
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


Preserving The Summer

by Laurie Calloway

UFL Facebook Messenger Channel https://m.me/UrbanFarmLifestyle


September 6, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


by Laurie Calloway

For me, it always seems the end of August is really the start of the new year.  Teachers head back to the classroom, children return to school, routines are established, and sports begin a new season.

  August also marks a new year of sorts for the vegetable garden…there is much to harvest, and plants such as lettuce, kale, and collard greens make their appearance.

Those of us who lovingly maintain gardens, or even those who have been given vegetables from a neighbor’s overflowing crop, are often left to wonder what to do to preserve some of the bounty, so that it can be enjoyed throughout the winter.

The three main options are home canning, freezing, and drying, or dehydrating the produce.  Of these, freezing is probably the easiest, a method often used.

  It is best to have a separate freezer; upright or chest in your home, especially if you have a variety of fruit or vegetables to preserve.

 Fruit such as strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, and blackberries can be rinsed and placed in a single layer on cookie sheets, put in the freezer, then later removed and placed into plastic storage bags.

  Apples, figs, peaches and plums do better cut up and cooked slightly with a bit of water and some sugar boiled together to make a light syrup, then placed into storage containers or bags.

Vegetables such as sliced summer squash, green beans and corn (removed from the cob), for example, should be prepared for freezing by a process known as blanching, where the vegetables are placed in boiling water for about 2 to 3 minutes, then cooled by placing in ice water, or pouring cold water over them. 

Frozen Vegetables
Frozen Vegetables

They should sit in ice water for as long as they were in the boiling water.  Corn can also be frozen on the cob; just shuck the corn, remove the silk, cut the cob in half or in thirds, and place the cobs in boiling water for 3 to 4 minutes.

Again, have ice water ready to cool the corn, and leave in for about 3 to 4 minutes.

Thoroughly drain the blanched and cooled vegetables, and place in freezer bags or storage containers, getting as much air as possible out in order to prevent freezer burn.  (A wonderful tool for this is a vacuum food sealer.  There are some inexpensive ones on the market which do a good job in sealing the bags so little or no air remains.)

Drying, or dehydrating vegetables and fruit is another option for preserving vegetables and fruits.  This is easily done with a food dehydrator.

There are many types of these in various price ranges.  I have found that an inexpensive model works quite well, and can hold as many as eight trays of produce.

Tomatoes are quite easy to dry; just slice into thin slices and place on the trays.

Tomatoes
Prepared Tomatoes

Dehydrator

Other vegetables, such as eggplant, can also be cut into ¼ slices and dried, but should be blanched first in boiling water before being placed on the trays.

Most dehydrators come with recipe booklets outlining the best methods to dry various fruits and vegetables.

 Oven-drying on trays is another method if you do not have an electric dehydrator.  The food is washed, sliced and placed on trays in an oven on a low heat, around 140 degrees.

This method does require you to frequently check what you are drying so that the food does not get too crisp.  Ideally, it should feel dry to the touch, but not be too brittle.

Store the dried vegetables in airtight or vacuum-sealed bags.  You can refrigerate or freeze the bags if very long-term storage is desired.  (I have not found that to be necessary.)

Vacuum-Sealed
Vacuum-Sealed Food Storage

Finally, home canning is another popular way to preserve your garden fruits and vegetables.

Pressure Cooker
Pressure Cooker

Over the past several years there has been a renewed interest in canning, and supplies can be found not only in hardware stores, but in retail and grocery stores as well.

There are two methods of canning; using a hot water bath canner, or a pressure canner.

The hot water bath method is used for high-acid, or high sugar content foods, such as pickles, salsa, and jam.

Lower acid vegetables such as green beans and corn need to be processed under pressure using a pressure canner. (Foods such as tomatoes were processed by our grandmothers and mothers using the hot water bath; now the USDA guidelines recommend using a pressure canner.)

There are many excellent books and websites to explore if you wish to try home canning.

If you are new to canning, making jam is a good place to start.  Older recipes call for cooking down your fruit using a fair amount of sugar.

These days, there are lower sugar options available that are just as delicious as the jams with high sugar content. 

Using low or no sugar added pectin is the key to making a flavorful jam with less sugar.  A good recipe to start with is low-sugar blueberry jam. 

Fresh blueberries are available throughout the summer in most grocery stores, even if you missed the local blueberry season.


Check It Out!


Quick Tip

 

Remember:
  • Use only fresh ripe fruit.
  • Stir jam mixture constantly while it boils
  • A pat of butter will reduce foaming.
  • Check jars for any nicks or cracks before using.
  • Check the lids for a seal by pressing down on them.  If they flex, the lid did not seal, and you must refrigerate the jam.
  • Canning guidelines have changed a great deal over the years.

At one time, processing in a hot water bath was not used for jam; the heat from the hot jam caused the lids to seal. 

However, it is now recommended to process the half-pints for 10 minutes in a hot water bath canner.


Bibliography:

by Laurie Calloway



Posted in Health, Magazine Issues, Plants, Recipes Tagged with: , , ,

Biodynamic Viticulture

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle

Biodynamic Viticulture

Biodynamic viticulture (grape growing) uses organic farming methods, while following Rudolf Steiner’s (1861-1925), formula of planting and harvesting by astronomical configurations.  Sort of like the Farmer’s Almanac but a little more intense.

David Proctor

 

 
  
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


Biodynamic Viticulture

by David Proctor

UFL Facebook Messenger Channel https://m.me/UrbanFarmLifestyle


August 30, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


One of the key components of biodynamic farming, besides the astronomical practices is treating the earth as a “living and receptive organism”. 

“The concept behind biodynamics is that everything in the universe is interconnected and gives off a resonance or ‘vibe’. The interconnectivity of everything even includes celestial bodies like the moon, planets and stars. Biodynamic viticulture is the practice of balancing this resonance between vine, man, earth and stars. Essentially, biodynamics is a holistic view of agriculture.” (Wine Folly)

One of the strangest practices for preparing to fertilize the fields, is to first get a bunch of cow horns and stuff them full of cow manure and bury them.  After a period of time the horns are dug up and the green manure has changed into a rich fertilizer, thanks to worms and microbes.

Horns Stuffed With Manure
Horns Stuffed With Manure

“Stop to think about why a cow horn is used, it goes back to being a symbol of abundance.  The Viking would drink from horns, the Chinese believe in the concept, that is why the Rhino horn is coveted.  In fact, we believe in the tradition of abundance when we display the cornucopia at Thanksgiving”.

I’m not advocating that we all start burring horns in our yard full of poop, just saying their seems to be a precedence to the practice.

Several other practices are used for controlling or enhancing the biological aspects of the vineyard and that is chamomile (natural antiseptic) and stinging nettles (a natural cleanser) as examples.

The soils when tested, do show a greater disease suppression, a decrease in compaction and additional organic material verses non-organic soils.

The biodynamic practice follows a calendar that has four basic parts:

  1. Fruit Days: Best days for harvesting grapes
  2. Root Days: Ideal days for pruning
  3. Flower Days: Leave the vineyard alone on these days
  4. Leaf Days: Ideal days for watering plants

 

Biodynamic Calendar
Biodynamic Calendar

Besides the calendar, no chemicals or manufactured additions are allowed in the wine, like commercial yeast or adjusting the acidity.
 
Does the wine taste different?  According to some it does.  The wine is supposed to enhance or have better expressions of terroir or character. Some say that the wine stays drinkable longer than other wines and has a more noted stronger yet clearer taste which is also more vibrant.

How do you know when you buy a wine if it is biodynamic? Biodynamic is not a defined and regulated term such as organic. Their does exist two governing bodies to certify the strict rules and regulations for certification, and they are:

  1. Demeter International (Certifies predominately North America)
  2. Biodyvin (certifies only 100 European wineries)

 

Demeter Certification
Demeter Certification

In that case why not just by organic wine.  No reason not to, but you have to look at the process that goes into the biodynamic wine.  Biodynamic predates “organic” by at least twenty years. 

Some say that it is worth it to drink these wines, due to taste, flavor and being in tune with the cosmos.
 
When it is all said and done, if your spirit tells you to role with the cosmic vibe, then biodynamic is your choice.


Check It Out!

Biodynamic vs Traditional

Biodynamic vs Traditional


Quick Tip

An Introduction to Biodynamic Viticulture 7:02

at0zwinew0rks
Published on Oct 12, 2011


Bibliography:

“Biodynamic Wine.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 22 Aug. 2018, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biodynamic_wine.

“What’s the Difference between Organic, Biodynamic, and Sustainable Wines? | Ask Dr. Vinny | Wine Spectator.” WineSpectator.com, www.winespectator.com/drvinny/show/id/41226.

“Getting Into Biodynamic Wine.” Wine Folly, Wine Folly, 16 Sept. 2015, winefolly.com/review/biodynamic-wine-guide/.



 

Posted in Animal Husbandry, Health, Magazine Issues, Plants Tagged with:

Reset

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle

 

Reset

Last week I was totally booked up with things that I needed to accomplish at work.  I had at least twelve-hour days set up to even start to get done what needed to be done.  So, what did I do…I went camping and hiking for three days.

David Proctor

 

 
  
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


Mind & Body Reset

by David Proctor


August 16, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


It just so happened that my daughter wanted to go to Grayson Highlands State Park to camp and backpack.  The objective was to drive down, find a place to leave the car and backpack along the Appalachian Trail to get to Mount Rogers Summit. 

Park Entrance
Park Entrance

Mount Rogers Summit is 5,729 feet, making it the highest point in Virginia.  The hike to the summit is about 4.5 miles each way.  Carolyn planed on hiking part way and setting up camp, then the next day make the hike both ways without having to pack in too much equipment.
 
With some quick shopping, I was prepared to go along.  The three of us, Carolyn, her dog King (7-month-old pit mix) and myself.  The dog had not been on an overnight campout nor an 8-mile hike.  For that matter I hadn’t been on an 8-mile hike that involved elevation hiking and decent.

I have walked a lot doing site surveys for work and could do the canal path in Fredericksburg without any problem, so I figured I was set.

We got to the state park and found the overnight parking for hikers.  We then loaded up our backpacks and set off.  About a mile latter I was dead tired.  Carolyn left me along the trail to find a place to camp, which she did just a short distance away.  She came back and got me. 

Rhododendron Trail
Rhododendron Trail

I couldn’t believe she found a campsite right off the trail, set back over 100’ with rocks already in circles for a campfire.  You did good Mrs. Bailey.  Camp Wild Wood taught her well.

We found a small area to set up our tents.  Of course, I set mine up on a slope.  That night it was like trying to sleep on a Teflon pan, I kept sliding downhill.
 
We got up the next day and proceeded on the hike to the summit.  That was the longest 4 to 41/2 miles I have hiked in a long time.  I didn’t even have a pack on.  Carolyn carried the pack.  I know, I felt bad her hauling the pack but she insisted.

Me
Me

It was a beautiful day and hike.  King, Carolyn’s dog did great hiking up to the summit.  We made it about lunch time and found the survey marker on a big rock.  That is after trying to figure out where the trail went, because there where no signs saying “Hey, You Are At The Summit”, just a small surveyors placard stating U.S. Coast & Geodetic Survey.  Other hikers where hiking on as we did, trying to figure out where the summit was at.

Sitting On Top of Summit Marker

Sitting On Top of  Summit Marker

Survey Summit Marker
Survey Summit Marker

Getting to the summit we hiked through an area that was covered with Spruce trees and evergreen trees that had moss growing all over the trunks.  Very storybook looking.

Moss

Moss

I thought this is great, made it to the summit and it’s all downhill from here.  About a half mile into the descent, a muscle around my right knee started to ache.  The more we went down hill the worse it got.  Who would have thought that going downhill was harder than going up, but it was, at least for my body?

Trail

Trail 

View
View

After many stops, we made it back to camp.  I didn’t bother moving my tent to another location that night.  Early the next morning, after a restless sleep I woke up with my head below my feet. As I setup I felt vertigo kick in.  I thought great, bum leg now vertigo and we still have to backpack about a mile to mile and a half back to the car.

Back At Camp

Back At Camp

Tired Dog
Tired Dog

It was slow going but made it back to the car. We loaded up and drove back to Fredericksburg.  Even though I had some minor problems with the old body of mine, it was hard to leave. Even the dog wanted to stay. As it turned out, this was exactly what I needed.  My body and mind had a much needed disconnect from the world of internet and business.  My mind, body, and eyes had spent several days focusing on and feeling the scenery that was all around us.

Redwing Irrish Setter Boots
Redwing Irrish Setter Boots

I may not have gone through what I had planned to accomplish last week, but what I got out of being back in nature and being with family was so worth it.

Undergrowth
Undergrowth

This was the natural reset that I needed.  I feel better and can think better.  Please take the time, even if it is just in your backyard, to get outside and take in the sun and surroundings.  You will be glad you did and your mind and body will thank
you for it.

Forest Trail
Forest Trail

Check It Out!

Hike to Mount Rogers Summit
Hike to Mount Rogers Summit

Quick Tip

1. Set your tent up on level ground.
2. Have more than one way to start a fire.
3. Build up to the hike ahead, days before.

Panoramic

Panoramic


Bibliography: N/A



Posted in Health, Magazine Issues, Plants Tagged with: , ,

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