3D Ocean Farming

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle

3D Ocean Farming

Ocean farming could be the next big thing in aquaculture; improving the water, transforming workers from fisheries into restoring our waters and fueling our country, feeding our nation and fighting climate change.

David Proctor

 

 
  
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


3D Vertical Ocean Farming

by David Proctor


July 19, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


Author Emily Gertz,
“Bren Smith wants to create thousands of decent jobs, transform how we harvest food from the oceans, and blunt the effects of climate change and marine degradation — all at the same time. His big idea: small-scale marine farms.

As a fisherman in Newfoundland, Bren Smith (TEDxBermuda Talk: The least deadliest catch) saw his livelihood vanish when the Atlantic seaboard’s cod stocks collapsed in the 1990s after years of overfishing. He managed to make a successful transition into shellfish farming in the Long Island Sound — until he was all but ruined again when powerful hurricanes demolished his oyster crops two years in a row. “What I realized then was, this isn’t a slow lobster boil of climate change,” Smith says. “We’re on the front lines of a crisis.”

Traditional methods of fishing or aquaculture won’t work under current conditions — we need a 21st-century strategy. Like other oyster farmers, Smith had raised his shellfish in cages on the seafloor. However, Hurricane Irene in 2011 and Hurricane Sandy in 2012 both kicked up massive amounts of marine sediment that smothered 90 percent of his harvest.

He realized he had to diversify his farming and raise multiple marine species including seaweeds, for which he knew there was a rising demand. With no experience in sea greens, Smith tapped the expertise of University of Connecticut marine scientist Charles Yarish. Yarish has researched seaweeds for decades and advocates cultivating them for food as well as for ocean remediation.

But raising different crops wasn’t enough — Smith had to re-design ocean farming, too. He wondered: What if we could take a vertical approach to aquaculture? He calls his technique “3D ocean farming.” It consists of horizontal ropes on the water’s surface, anchored to hurricane-proof floats, that connect to lines underwater supporting seaweed crops and interspersed with hanging net enclosures to grow scallops and mussels.

Clam and oyster cages, also connected to the surface ropes, sit on the seafloor. This kind of farm is barely visible from the shore, Smith notes. His Thimble Island Ocean Farm, which occupies 40 acres of the Long Island Sound, raises two types of seaweed, mussels, oysters and scallops. The farm provides significant non-edible benefits as well: it serves as a storm-surge protector and as a habitat for marine wildlife.”

Illustration by Stephanie Stroud

Illustration by Stephanie Stroud

“Seaweed farming can offset some of the serious problems facing the oceans. Unlike land-based crops, seaweed is what Smith calls “zero-input food” — it requires no additional fresh water, fertilizer, pesticides, feed or soil to grow. It receives everything it needs from the sun and the sea.

It grows super-fast — sugar kelp, one of the varieties farmed by Smith, can grow an inch or more a day. Seaweed improves the marine environment by absorbing dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus, two pollutants that wind up in the ocean via agricultural runoff, and carbon dioxide, which drives ocean acidification and global warming. (Oysters are another good nitrogen remover.) Packed with protein, vitamin C and calcium, seaweed is a nutritious addition to human diets. Finally, it can be used as a potent soil fertilizer and as animal feed.

A new kind of aquaculture needs a new workforce. In 2013, Smith established the nonprofit organization GreenWave to train new seaweed farmers and provide them with two years of support. (The 3D ocean farming model itself is open-source — anyone can use or build on it for free.) With about $30,000, a boat and a lease (which requires approvals from state regulators and the US Army Corps of Engineers) to farm 20 acres of near-shore seafloor, anyone can start a 3D ocean farm that produces 10 to 30 tons of kelp and 250,000 shellfish per acre in five months, according to Smith.

GreenWave also supports research and development of consumer and industrial products derived from seaweed and collaborates with chefs to create appealing kelp dishes. Humans currently consume just a fraction of the 10,000 edible marine plants, points out Smith, so the potential for discovering new crops and flavors is huge.

Smith has also set up a parallel for-profit enterprise, which provides a market for seaweed crops and operates a commercial processing and distribution facility in New Haven, Connecticut. It promises to purchase 80 percent of seaweed harvests at triple the market rate from GreenWave farmers during their first five years in business. “Farmers know they can sell what they grow,” Smith says, “and that’s a real incentive to start farms.” Someday, he imagines, we could have a thriving surf-and-turf economy made up of many small seaweed-and-shellfish farms along the coasts that drive land-based employment.

Smith’s vision for ocean farming is spreading. So far, GreenWave’s program has resulted in 10 people who are tending seaweed farms, with another 25 in training. In 2015, GreenWave’s 3D ocean farming model won the Buckminster Fuller Institute’s Fuller Challenge, an ecological design prize that recognizes innovative and comprehensive approaches to solving the problems created by marine degradation and climate change.

Smith is now preparing to pilot the 3D ocean farming method in the United Kingdom. “I thought it was going to take me 20 years to develop the market on this, and actually the real challenging thing has been building the infrastructure,” he says. “We need more farms. We have standing orders for about 500,000 pounds of kelp a year, and we can’t meet them all.” “

Being on the east coast, this article caught my eye.  It makes you wonder about how this simple restorative means of aquaculture could really transform our agriculture.


Check It Out!

Vertical ocean farming – the least deadliest catch | Bren Smith | TEDxBermuda  15:18


Quick Tip

Top 7 Kelp Benefits

Top 7 Kelp Benefits


Bibliography:

Gertz, Emily. “Vertical Ocean Farms That Can Feed Us and Help Our Seas.” Ideas.ted.com, Ideas.ted.com, 31 July 2017, ideas.ted.com/vertical-ocean-farms-that-can-feed-us-and-help-our-seas/.



 

Posted in fish, Health, Magazine Issues, Plants Tagged with: ,

Tomatoes

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle

Tomatoes

Tomatoes are a standby, go-to plant to have in a garden.  I will share insights from pros like Joe Lamp’l of Growing A Greener World and others as tips for growing and preparing tomatoes.

David Proctor

 

 
  
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


Tips For Growing And Preparing Tomatoes

by David Proctor


July 12, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


In almost any garden that you pass by, you will find tomato plants. It seems as though they have always been one of the first things you want to get in the garden. 
 
When I was young we had tomato plants in our family garden.  We would place tomato stakes by them and tie them up with old leg hosiery that had been discarded due to runs.  This was a strong fabric that would hold the plants and also flex as the plants grew.
 
Joe Lamp’l has come up with a much stronger solution that will hold up even the most challenging plants which he calls the “Ultimate Tomato Support“.

Joe Lamp'l
Joe Lamp’l

You can get the needed supplies at your local farm supply store. To read more please click this Link


Next up is a recipe by Nathan Lyon, a Chef featured on Growing A Greener World.  This recipe is called Rosemary Garlic Tomato Confit.

Chef Nathan Lyon

Chef Nathan Lyon

Ingredients:1 cup Extra-Virgin Olive Oil
3 large cloves garlic, crushed, skins discarded
1 sprig of rosemary, 3-inches, bruised
2 bay leaves
2 pints cherry or teardrop tomatoes, halved
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, as needed
½ pound dried pasta
To follow the recipe please click Link


To find out about different tomato plants, an organization called Seed Savers can help with finding the heirloom tomatoes you may be looking for.  This is one of the organizations that works towards saving and swapping seeds with fellow gardeners. 

Seed Swap Tent At Monticello
Seed Swap Tent At Monticello

These seeds have been passed down from one generation to the next.  Some of the vegetables and fruits may not look like what you would find in the store but they offer a unique taste.  The tomato seeds they have are a good start to growing a unique and flavorful tomato that you can’t buy.

Black Krim Heriloom Tomato
Black Krim Heriloom Tomato
It is a little late to start your tomato plants from seeds.  It would be best to purchase your tomato plants and get them in the ground.  Water your plants generously the first few days and continue with consistency throughout the growing season. 
 
It helps to mulch around the plants to help retain the moisture and keep the weeds from growing around them.
 
Try to leave the tomatoes on the vine as long as you can.  If you pick early and place on a windowsill, they can rot before they ripen.  Try not to refrigerate fresh tomatoes.  Doing so can change the flavor and texture. 
 
If you want to freeze fresh tomatoes, core and place them in whole, in freezer bags.  The skins will slip off when they defrost.
 
So, get out and get the plants in the ground.  Just think about that BLT that is just around the corner.

Check It Out

 

 

Jeff Bernhard 8:20
Published on May 21, 2016

 


Quick Tip

 

Podcast


Bibliography:

Says, Joe Lamp’l. “The Ultimate Tomato Cage in 5 Simple Steps.” Growing A Greener World®. N.p., 14 May 2016. Web. 23 May 2017.

Lyon, Nathan. “Rosemary Garlic Tomato Confit.” Growing A Greener World®. N.p., 26 Aug. 2013. Web. 23 May 2017.

Almanac, Old Farmer’s. “Old Farmer’s Almanac.” Old Farmer’s Almanac. Yankee Publishing Inc, n.d. Web. 23 May 2017.



 

Posted in Magazine Issues, Plants, Recipes Tagged with: , , ,

Diatomaceous Earth

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle

Diatomaceous Earth

Get rid of fleas, ticks, bedbugs, ants and any exoskeleton insect naturally with 100% food grade diatomaceous earth.

David Proctor

 

 
  
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 


Diatomaceous Earth

by David Proctor


July 5, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


 

What is diatomaceous earth or DE? 

“Diatomaceous earth is a soft, powdery, porous, and silica-rich mineral that is found in fossilized deposits near dried up bodies of water.  This mineral is the result of the accumulation of dead diatoms found in marine sediments, which contain the remains of silica.”
 
I have found that quite a few people take the 100% food grade internally and according to Dr. Axe has these benefits:
 

  1. Detoxify the body by cleansing the digestive tract, boosting liver function, helps eliminate heavy metals in the body such as aluminum, and acts as a detoxifier for the blood since it carries a negative charge that attaches to free radicals and other harmful toxins.

 

  1. Helps purify water by killing viruses and in filtering out heavy metals

 

  1. Fights parasites by adding to the feed given to pets and farm animals.

 

  1. Can be used as a natural insecticide, since it absorbs lipids from the waxy outer layer of insets’ exoskeletons, which causes them to dehydrate and die.  DE can be used to eliminate bed bugs, house dust mites, cockroach, ants and fleas, without the use of toxic chemicals.

 

  1. Beneficial for joints and bones and can help prevent low bone mass.

 

  1. Helps clean and protect skin, nails and teethe.

 
The use that I thought was interesting was for ants and fleas.  These are two very hardy insects and hard to get rid of once they make your way into your home.

Diatomaceous earth is a really inexpensive way to control external and internal parasites in your dog and cat.
 
The microscopically sharp edges contact the insect or parasite, and pierce their protective coating, so they soon dehydrate and die.  The larvae is affected in the same way. But DE is completely harmless to animals.
 
The only thing that you should be very careful about is not inhaling a lot into your lungs.  It is easy to do, so if need be, wear a mask if you think you might inhale a lot while working with your pet.
 
DE can be placed on your pet, cat or dog and the powder rubbed through the fur to the skin. When the fleas come in contact with the DE, it will help eliminate them.  I don’t have a flea problem in the house, but I have had to deal with it in the past. I wished I had know about DE.
 
One problem I am anxious to try this out on is ants.  I have had an ant problem in the house for about a year now.  They haven’t taken over, just around enough to be a real annoyance.

Another use I would really like to try this out on, is with the chickens.  It appears that DE can really help chickens with egg production.
 
The Food and Drug Administration lists Food Grade diatomaceous earth as “Generally Recognized as Safe”, which means it’s legally allowed to be added to many different types of foods, beverages and supplements.

How To Use Diatomaceious Earth

In summary, it is my belief that Diatomaceious Earth can be a very useful product for eliminating pest naturally.  I do not know enough about the product that I would necessarily take it internally, but I would not be opposed to trying it.


Check It Out!


Quick Tip

Natural Pest Control

-DO NOT USE POOL GRADE DE-


Bibliography:

Scott, Dana. “Diatomaceous Earth: Get Rid Of Fleas & Ticks Naturally!” Dogs Naturally Magazine. N.p., 01 May 2017. Web. 26 June 2017.

“The Most Versatile Detoxifier Around.” Dr. Axe. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 June 2017.

“Before You Go…” DiatomaceousEarth.com Official Site to Learn About Diatomaceous Earth. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 June 2017.

Winger, Jill “How to Use Diatomaceous Earth.” The Prairie Homestead. N.p., 26 Sept. 2016. Web. 26 June 2017.


What Did You Think?

Let us know your thoughts on today’s issue.


Posted in Animal Husbandry, Health, Magazine Issues Tagged with:

Gluten Intolerance

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle

Gluten Intolerance

Up until a few years ago I had not heard of gluten intolerance, but now my church even has gluten free communion.  So, what is gluten and how does it affect our body?

David Proctor

 

 
  
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


Gluten Intolerance

by David Proctor


June 28, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


Gluten (from Latin gluten, “glue”) is a mixture of proteins found in wheat and related grains, including barley, rye, oat, and all their species and hybrids (such as spelt, kamut, and triticale).

It sounds like gluten should be good for us except that part about the glue. When you take flour and mix in water you will form an elastic material that can be shaped, stretched and formed.

This material is known as dough and is used to make bread and cakes. Sometimes even extra gluten is added to form different textures in cakes.

dough
Bread Dough

“But those same “binding” properties also interfere with the breakdown and absorption of nutrients, including the nutrients from other foods in the same meal. The result can be likened to a glued-together constipating lump in your gut, which can impede proper digestion.

The undigested gluten then triggers your immune system to attack the lining of your small intestine, which can cause symptoms like diarrhea or constipation, nausea and abdominal pain.

Over time, your small intestine becomes increasingly damaged and inflamed. This in turn can lead to malabsorption of nutrients and nutrient deficiencies, anemia, osteoporosis and other health problems.

The condition can also cause a wide array of other symptoms that are not gastrointestinal in nature, including neurological or psychological problems, and problems related to the skin, liver, joints, nervous system and more.

Celiac disease is also connected to autoimmunity. If you’re diagnosed with celiac’s after the age of 20, your chances of developing an autoimmune condition skyrocket from the average 3.5 percent to 34 percent.

Undiagnosed celiac disease is also associated with a nearly four-fold increased risk of premature death.”
 
Gluten can be found in a lot of food products such as beer, pasta, all sorts of breads like pretzels, bagels, pizza, and the list goes on.

So I have to ask, why can some people tolerate gluten while others can not? Is this another one of the new age allergies? I never even heard of gluten intolerance until the last few years.

There are several factors that have contributed to the rise in this intolerance and a lot has to do with the hybridization of wheat that has resulted in higher levels of the gluten protein. Another change  is the wide use of   glyphosate (Roundup herbicide) being heavily used in wheat production to stimulate more seeds and higher yields.

Wheat
Wheat

Roundup is used as a “Preharvest” on wheat.  The application is absorbed into the wheat and and kills the wheat since it is not GMO, thus producing a more even harvest.  This is not allowed on wheat used for products like beer.  

Preharvest
Preharvest

Higher yields sounds like a good thing, and it can be, but in the last 15 years or more the use has greatly increased along with the rise in Celiac Disease. Glyphosate can damage your gut flora and can cause severe problems.  Glyphosate has been found in the foods that we eat like pizza and bagels.

“Not only does the glyphosate seriously impair the villi in your gut, it also inhibits a process that normally helps your body digest wheat proteins.

Chart
Chart

The gliadin in gluten is difficult to break down and digest. Normally a reaction takes place that builds connections between different proteins in the wheat.

Glyphosate appears to attach to the gliadin as a consequence of a chemical reaction, and by interfering with the protein connections, glyphosate makes the wheat highly indigestible — more so than it already is — and more likely to cause an immune reaction and gut dysbiosis.” http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/07/02/gluten-food-processing.aspx writes,  Dr. Mercola

Another culprit contributing to the gluten intolerance epidemic is how wheat is milled and bread is made

“The endosperm and the starch are roller milled, but all the other ingredients are first extracted and then added back in at varying proportions, depending on the requirements of the end product. What you end up with is highly refined wheat flour that is more likely to cause GI problems.

Whole grain flour is made by grinding the whole grain using a stone mill. Nothing is taken out and nothing is added in. The end product contains the entire grain, hence the term “whole grain.” The process is much simpler and less destructive to the nutritional content of the grain.

While whole grain bread still contains gluten, it might not cause as severe a problem if you don’t have celiac disease. Some believe the problems attributed to gluten may in fact be related more so to the chemicals used during the processing of refined wheat flour, than to gluten itself.”
 http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/07/02/gluten-food-processing.aspx according to Dr. Mercola

The other thing that has changed is how long the dough is let to rise. The dough used to rise overnight, allowing the yeast enzymes to break down the gluten.

In today’s methods the dough often only rises for a couple of hours. Thus containing more indigestible gluten than in breads made in the past. The best practice to not have the symptoms from ingesting gluten is to abstain from whole grains.

But I thought everyone was supposed to eat whole grains as part of a good diet?

Mill
Mill

According to “The U.S. Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, a group of scientists convened to offer nutrition recommendations for Americans to the federal government, has said, “dietary patterns of the American public are suboptimal and are causally related to poor individual and population health and higher chronic disease rates.

” The scientists recommended diets higher in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains than is currently consumed. “Across all ages and both sexes,” they added, “the U.S. population does not meet the goal for whole grain intake, The inadequate intake of whole grains leads to underconsumption of several … nutrients of public health concern.” http://www.livescience.com/51826-gluten-free-diets-can-be-unhealthy.html     
Katherine Tallmadge

It appears that unless you are on the paleo diet, you should be eating more whole grains.  As usual, industry has jumped on the bandwagon of “gluten free” which even French fries can be classified as gluten free.

So what to make of this, if you have celiac disease, you do not have much choice but to abstain from gluten.  To follow the US Dietary Guidelines will be hard for the rest of us, if you eat processed foods and have symptoms of gluten intolerance. One solution for some may be to eat organic foods and try to stay away from processed foods as much as possible.

It appears again that one of the health problems that many in this country are suffering from points back to the food industry.

This will only continue to get worse until we use our food dollars to vote for a change. A change in how our food is grown and processed. The food industry will take note.


Check It Out!


Quick Tip

Gluten

 


Bibliography:
Dr. Mercola, “How Gluten and Modern Food Processing Contribute to Poor Health.” N.p., July-Aug. 2016. Web. <http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive /2016/07/02/gluten-food-processing.aspx>.

Tallmadge, Katherine, M.A., R.D. “The Dangers of Going Gluten-Free (Op-Ed).” N.p., Aug.-Sept. 2015. Web. <http://www.livescience.com/51826-gluten-free- diets-can-be-unhealthy.html>.

LUPKIN, SYDNEY. “5 Gluten Myths You Were Too Embarrassed to Ask About.” Abcnews, May-June 2014. Web. <http://abcnews.go.com/Health/gluten-myths -embarrassed/story?id=23645211>.

Sarah. “The Real Reason Wheat Is Toxic (It’s Not the Gluten).” The Healthy Home Economist, 4 Mar. 2018, www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/real-reason-for-toxic-wheat-its-not-gluten/.


What Did You Think?

Let us know your thoughts on today’s issue. 


Posted in Health, Magazine Issues, Plants Tagged with: , , ,

Trip to the Beach

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle

Trip To The Beach

One of our families’ favorite places to go to decompress is the beach.  Somehow it seems like the waves just make the tensions go away.

 

David Proctor

 

 
  
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


Family Vacation

by David Proctor


June 21, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


We have spent many summers going to the beach. Going to the beach is probably a carryover from Molly and I always enjoying the lakes and rivers back in Missouri.  It just seems like we always planned things around water.

Sun Rise

 Sun Rise

The one thing different about going to the beach is looking out over the ocean and seeing a horizon but not the other side.  I know of course you can’t see the other side, but that in itself is what makes going to the beach so humbling.  The vastness of the water reminds oneself that we are just a small, but important part of this creation.

Morning Boat Ride
 Morning Boat Ride

You let your feelings go with the waves, knowing that it doesn’t help to worry, about what seemed, before hand important.  It seems like worrying about things is what we are suppose to do.  But worry has not changed the course of events in my life.  So, let the waves take them away.

Waves Breaking
 Waves Breaking

When you walk along the water and look back at the steps you left, they are soon washed away and a clean slate is left.

Sandy Feet
 Sandy Feet

That is what impressed me so much the first time that Molly and I saw the ocean.  It was as if now, nobody was going to tell us what we could or couldn’t do.  We had a whole new life to explore.  Our dreams were only as big as we could imagine.  With the ocean in front of us, it made us dream big.

Atlantic Ocean
 Atlantic Ocean

Life is not easy.  No one every told me it would be this hard.  When I am able to take a deep breath and just let my mind go, that is when I know I can get back in the game and keep going.

Beach Day
 Beach Day

My point is to take the time to decompress.  Let the emails go, let the voice mails go and just take in what is around you.  Smell the roses or ocean air.


Check It Out!

Annual Boardwalk Art Festival
Annual Boardwalk Art Festival
Artist come from all over Virginia and the eastern seaboard for this annual event.

Quick Tip

1. Water
2. Sunscreen
3. Umbrella



 

Posted in Health, Magazine Issues Tagged with: ,

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