Halloween Pumpkins

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy-Sustainable-Regenerative Lifestyle 

Pumpkins

Pumpkins are used for decorations around the holidays and are also good to eat. This article will show some of the varieties of pumpkins, and ways to decorate with them.

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

It is all about the soil!

 

 

 


Decorative & Edible Pumpkins

by David Proctor 


 October 15, 2020

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


One of the fun activities around Halloween is pumpkin carving.  I have seen some really creative and scary pumpkins come out of my house.

Pumpkin nutrition facts

The following is from nutrition and you.

“Pumpkin is one of the most widely grown vegetables, incredibly rich in vital antioxidants, and vitamins.

Though this humble backyard vegetable is low in calories, it carries vitamin A, and flavonoid poly-phenolic antioxidants such as lutein, xanthin, and carotenes in abundance.

Pumpkin is a fast-growing vine that creeps along the surface in a similar fashion to that of other Cucurbitaceae family vegetables and fruits such as cucumber, squash, cantaloupes…etc.

 

Pumpkins

Traditional Pumpkins

It is one of the most popular field crops cultivated around the world, including in the USA at a commercial scale for its fruit, and seeds.

Pumpkins vary greatly in shape, size, and colors. Giant pumpkins generally weigh 8–13 lbs with the largest capable of reaching a weight of over 55 lbs.

Decorative Pumpkin

Decorative Pumpkin

Golden-nugget pumpkins are flat, smaller, and feature sweet creamy orange color flesh.

Pumpkins, in general, feature orange or yellow outer skin color; however, some varieties can exhibit dark to pale green, brown, white, red, and gray.

Variations in Pumpkins

Variations in Pumpkins

Their color characteristics are largely influenced by yellow-orange pigments in their skin and pulp. Its thick rind is smooth with light, vertical ribs.

Cinderella Type Pumpkin

Cinderella Type Pumpkin

In structure, the fruit features golden-yellow to orange flesh depending upon the poly-phenolic pigments in it. The fruit has a hollow center, with numerous small, off-white colored seeds interspersed in a net-like structure.”

Saving Pumpkin Seeds

  1. Remove the pulp and seeds from inside the pumpkin. Place this in a colander.
  2. Place the colander under running water. As the water runs over the pulp, start picking out the seeds from the pulp. Rinse them in the running water as you pick them out. Do not let the pumpkin pulp sit in non-running water.
  3. There will be more seeds inside the pumpkin than you’re going to need to use, so once you have a good amount of seeds rinsed, look over them and choose the biggest seeds. Plan on saving 3 times more pumpkin seeds than the number of plants you will be growing next year. Larger seeds will have a better chance of germinating.
  4. Place the rinsed seeds on a dry paper towel. Make sure they are spaced out; otherwise, the seeds will stick to one another.
  5. Place in a cool dry spot for one week.
  6. Once the seeds are dry, store pumpkin seed for planting in an envelope.”

Properly Store Pumpkin Seeds for Planting

“When saving pumpkin seeds, you also need to store them so that they will be ready to plant for next year. Any seeds, pumpkin or otherwise, will store best if you keep them somewhere cold and dry.

One of the best places to store pumpkin seed for planting next year is in your refrigerator.

Put your pumpkin seed envelope in a plastic container.

Place several holes in the lid of the container to ensure that condensation does not build up on the inside. Place the container with the seeds inside at the very back of the fridge.

Next year, when it comes time for planting pumpkin seeds, your pumpkin seeds will be ready to go.

Saving pumpkin seeds is a fun activity for the whole family, as even the smallest hand can help. And, after you properly store pumpkin seeds for planting, children can also help plant the seeds in your garden.”

 

Molly's Pumpkins

Molly’s Pumpkins


Check It Out!

 

How to Carve Halloween Pumpkins  4:04


Quick Tip

KETO PUMPKIN PIE | SUGAR FREE PUMPKIN PIE RECIPE | Thanksgiving Keto Recipes  4:39


Bibliography:

“How To Harvest And Store Pumpkin Seeds.” Gardening Know How. N.p., 30 Aug. 2008. Web. 15 Oct. 2020.

“Pumpkin Heirloom Seeds.” Heirloom Pumpkin Seeds. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Oct. 2020.

“Pumpkin Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits.” Nutrition And You.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Oct. 2020.




 

Posted in Health, Magazine Issues, Plants, Recipes Tagged with: , , , , ,

Recycled Leaf Mold Compost

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy-Sustainable-Regenerative Lifestyle 

Leaf  Compost

Autumn is here and soon we will be putting our rakes and leaf blowers into action.  Once the leaves are collected DO NOT SEND TO LANDFILL!

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

It is all about the soil!

 

 

 


Recycling Your Leaves Into Compost

by David Proctor 


 October 08, 2020

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


Autumn is here and soon we will be putting our rakes into action. Once the leaves have been raked up what do you do with them?

When I drive around and see all the large leaf bags at the curbside waiting to be picked up to go to the landfill, I cannot help but think, “What a waste!”.

I have two thoughts when raking leaves,

  1. Why rake the leaves, to begin with?
  2. Why are you trying to get rid of them?

I have always loved being out in the fall. I enjoy walking through the leaves and enjoying the colors against an intense blue sky as a backdrop. But, as the leaves fall we all feel that every last one needs to be picked up and disposed of.

 

Compost Gold

Compost Gold

Leaves, as it turns out, are one of nature’s best compost materials or compost gold for your plants. They are dense in nutrients that have been collected by the trees that they fell from. 

It is nature’s way of mining for nutrients deep in the earth through tree roots, which then travel up to the leaves.  The only thing the tree does not do for us is mulch the leaves!

Do not dispose of the leaves, instead, you should try to collect as many as you can. Even take them from your neighbor if they do not want them. You will never have enough. 

Once these leaves compost down, the volume will be a fraction of what they are when first collected.

I very seldom will rake leaves, it just goes against my grain. It’s frustrating that the pile of leaves gets bigger and harder to move as you rake.  

Instead, I like to mow over the leaves and let them spread over the yard as a natural ground cover. If you do this for a few years you will have fewer dandelions and crabgrass.

Use a grass catcher to collect and then dump the mulched leaves if you would like to save them for your garden and flower plots. 

You will find that the pile is a fraction of the size of one created by raking, and they tend to not want to blow away like a pile created by raking and no mulching.

Leaf Mold For Composting

Leaf Mold For Composting

Another method is to use your leaf blower. Instead of blowing the leaves, use the attachment that is probably still brand new (because you could not for the life of you figure out why anyone would use a perfectly good leaf blower), to instead suck the leaves up into a bag. 

When the leaf blower is used in this fashion, it has a blade that will mulch the leaves before they go in the bag.

Take these mulched leaves and put them in an area that can be contained, such as a wire mesh or a walled-off area. This way the leaves will not be disturbed by strong winds, but are still accessible to rotate. 

This is for an open but contained composting method.

Compost Pile

Compost Pile

The leaf compost pile will need access to oxygen for the aerobic process to continue. If you use a closed system, where oxygen is not accessible, that is called anaerobic. 

Anaerobic is a process that I will talk about in a future article. For now, we will look at the benefits of the oxygen, or aerobic, process.

The one thing that is really good to add to the leaf pile is coffee grounds. Coffee grounds will add nitrogen and will help the plants with warding off disease. Coffee does not appear to add acidity as one might think. 

This is probably due to most of the acids being removed during brewing. So, save your coffee grounds for the leaf mulch.

The one thing I have not recommended for the leaf mulch pile is the kitchen scrapes. Which we all think will be great for the mulch pile, right? 

Hold on a minute! Those kitchen scraps are not going to add much to the mulch pile. You are much better off using them in a different mulch pile, preferably one which uses worms to break down the mulch or compost. 

This doesn’t mean that you will not have worms in a leaf mulch pile, but if you are feeding worms for worm castings, then that is the place to put the kitchen scraps.

What goes in the front of the worm, comes out the back end, a very rich product for your plants.

The other counter-intuitive is to start a mulch pile in the fall. One would think to mulch in the spring and have the warm weather help with the process. 

The problem is that the leaves are still on the trees and the spring is when you want to be spreading the mulch as a nutritious plant ground cover.

Leaves For Mulching

Leaves For Mulching

Just an inch or two is all it takes to help hold moisture for your plants and simultaneously release nutrients to feed them.

Once the mulch pile starts to break down, the temperature will rise internally and help keep the process going.

Be sure to keep the mulch pile from drying out by adding water at least once a week. 

Unless you are getting a lot of rain, then rotate with a pitchfork.

These types of mulching systems are open, where the material is on the ground in a pile. It is easy to access for watering and rotating, but neighbors may not be too keen on the looks.

If you rotate the pile, you should not have any smells.

The next type of system is open-contained. The containment may be a wire mesh, stacked blocks or, something commercially obtained (which is generally plastic and has interlocking walls). 

They all will work, it just depends on what you want to invest in.

Another system is contained but unsealed. This way oxygen can still be used in the decomposition process. 

The most commonly used product is barrels that open to add materials and can be rotated to mix content.

These barrels are normally pretty small and are not that easy to extract the materials from. So, I generally use the open system.

I have a decently large yard, and the designated space to mulch is not very noticeable. Mulching is a spot surrounded by trees that helps, as well.

Composting Bin

Composting Bin

If you prefer a more manicured yard, you may want to look at the contained systems to build or purchase.

Hopefully, now you see why it is a good idea to keep those leaves instead of sending them to the landfill. Now is the time to collect your leaf gold for your plants!


Check It Out!

Everything You Know About Composting is Wrong: Mike McGrath at TEDxPhoenixville  17:21


Quick Tip

 

Using Coffee Grounds:

• 10 to 20 percent of total compost volume have been reported as optimal for compost quality and effectiveness, while over 30 percent can be detrimental.

• Only small amounts of coffee grounds are required for effective disease suppression. Therefore, I recommend using no more than 20% by volume of coffee grounds in a compost pile. A diverse feedstock will ensure a diversity of microorganisms.

• Don’t assume coffee grounds will make an acidic compost; pH levels will undoubtedly change over time.

Linda Chalker-Scott, Ph.D.
MasterGardener WSU editor
Extension Urban Horticulturist
and Associate Professor,
Puyallup Research and Extension Center,
Washington State University
Puyallup, Washington
www.puyallup.


Bibliography:

“Leaf Mold, Mulch and Compost | Planet Natural.” Planet Natural RSS. N.p., 04 Dec. 2012. Web. 8 Oct. 2020.

“US Composting Council Announces the 2016 International Compost Awareness Week Poster Contest – Call for Entries for Poster Design.”US Composting Council. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct. 2020.

“CERTIFIEDCOMPOST.COM.” CERTIFIEDCOMPOST.COM. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct. 2020.

“Register for Our E-newsletter.” Cuyahoga County Solid Waste District. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct. 2020.
http://cuyahogaswd.org/pdf_cuyahogaswd/en US/Brochures/backyard_composting.pdf




 

Posted in Magazine Issues, Plants Tagged with: ,

Appalachian Apples

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy-Sustainable-Regenerative Lifestyle 

Appalachian Apple Recipes

During this time of year, my mind always goes to the times I have spent going to the Appalachians.  The changing leaf colors, smells, and views are appreciated by the esoteric few to have experienced this while gathering apples in an orchard. 

 

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

It is all about the soil!

 

 

 


Apple Picking & Recipes

by David Proctor & Laurie Calloway


 October 01, 2020

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


The fall is the time to be outdoors as the summer temperatures wind down to cooler, more tolerable days.

Now is the time to plan on picking apples!

You may have your own trees, but if not, take a trip to your local apple orchard and enjoy the peaceful time you can have and the rewards that later come out of the kitchen.

 

Graves Mountain Apple Orchard

Graves Mountain Apple Orchard

In the past, we have gone to Graves Mountain Apple Orchard to pick apples and if we timed it right, also attend the apple festival.

Not sure if that is going on this year with all the health concerns, but it seems to me this would be an ideal place to go to be healthy.

Apples

Apples

The festival has proven to be very popular, so much so that the apples had been picked clean by the time we made it last time. 

As you can see from the pictures, they have breathtaking views. 


by Laurie Calloway
 
In the 1994 blockbuster movie, Forrest Gump, Forrest’s friend, BubbaAnchor, enthusiastically educated him about all the ways to prepare shrimp.  And there were quite a few!  However, if any food can rival shrimp in the number of ways it can be prepared, the many varieties of the humble apple would certainly be at the top of the list. 

Most families have a favorite apple pie recipe, and more than likely, apple pies are probably the most popular way to make use of apples.  However, as delicious as they are, they can be a bit labor-intensive, especially if you prepare your own pastry for the crust. 

So, if time is not on your side, here are two recipes that can be prepared fairly quickly, filling your home with the wonderful autumn aroma of cooking apples and spices in short order.
 
Baked Apples (This recipe can be easily doubled or tripled)
 
Two large, firm, crisp apples
Two tablespoons melted butter
Two tablespoons brown sugar (light or dark)
1 teaspoon cinnamon or ½ teaspoon apple pie spice
1 tablespoon honey
2 tablespoons golden or dark raisins or dried blueberries
2 tablespoons chopped walnuts (Optional)
Aluminum foil and cookie sheet

 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.Wash and core apples, leaving at least a quarter to half-inch at the bottom of the apple.  (Take care not to core all the way through.)

1.

1.

2.

2.

Melt two tablespoons butter in the microwave oven in a small, microwave–safe bowl.  Add the brown sugar, honey, cinnamon, raisins or dried blueberries and walnuts.  Stir to combine.

3.

3.

4.

4.

Spoon the mixture into the cored apple, pressing it in tightly. Wrap each apple individually in foil, and place on foil-lined cookie sheet.  (I find this makes clean-up much easier.)

5.

5.

Bake for 40 to 45 minutes.  This time may vary due to differences in ovens, or in the size of your apples.  

Remove from oven, cool for at least five minutes, then unwrap from foil and serve as is, or with whipped cream or ice cream.
 
Oatmeal Apple Crisp (Makes approximately eight servings)
Eight medium-sized apples of your choice. I used Gala.   (If using Granny Smith apples, you may wish to increase the amount of sugar.)
 
Two cups old-fashioned (not quick oats) oatmeal
½ stick melted butter, and 2 tablespoons butter, divided
¼ cup granulated sugar
½ cup light or dark brown sugar
1 tablespoon flour
2 teaspoons cinnamon, divided
½ cup chopped walnuts (optional)8 or 9 inch square casserole,
(or 9 by 12 inch casserole, or large deep-dish pie pan), sprayed with canola or vegetable cooking spray, or greased with butter.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Peel and core apples. (This is the most time-consuming step.  However, I have a handy, little device that peels the apples lickety-spilt, then I core and slice them with an apple corer/slicer. 

If you cook a lot with apples, or can applesauce, you may consider investing in a device that either peels and cores, or just peels apples.) Place the sliced apples in the greased casserole, and sprinkle the granulated sugar, flour, and 1 teaspoon cinnamon. 

6.

6.

7.

7.

Toss to coat and mix, right in the casserole. Dot the top of the apples with a tablespoon of butter, cut into small pieces.

Melt butter in microwave using a medium-sized, microwave-safe mixing bowl. 

8.

8.

9.

9.

Add oats, brown sugar, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, and walnuts.  Mix well to combine.  Cover the apples in the casserole with the oat mixture.

Dot the top with tablespoon butter, cut into small pieces. (If desired, sprinkle a bit of cinnamon and granulated sugar on the top.)

Bake for 45 minutes to an hour.  

If you feel the topping is becoming too brown before the apples are cooked all the way through, cover with foil for the rest of the baking time.

Serve as is, or topped with cream, whipped cream, or spoon on top of your favorite ice cream!

With both of these recipes, the walnuts can be substituted with chopped pecans. 

10.

10.

Although the nuts are optional, unless you or a family member just does not like nuts, or is allergic, they make the finished product even more delicious.

Happy baking!


Check It Out!

by Laurie Calloway

Use only fresh, ripe apples to get the best results.

Apples vary in their natural sweetness.  When using sugar in any apple recipe, adjust according to taste.  Some apples may require little or no sugar, others more than what is stated in the recipe. 

Baking times and temperatures can often vary due to the variety, size, and freshness of your apples.  It is a good idea to check on your recipe while the apples are cooking to prevent over-browning of crusts or toppings.

Mixing up different varieties of apples in pies, applesauce, or apple butter often makes a better tasting final product.

A gadget such as an apple peeler/corer can be well-worth the investment if you bake a lot with apples, or can or freeze applesauce.


Quick Tip

If you wonder about how many to pick, a bushel of apples is about 48 pounds. 

This chart gives an idea of weights.  Note: When it comes to cooking with apples, it may be helpful to know the following:

  • 1 pound of apples = 2 large, 3 medium, or 4 to 5 small apples
  • 1 pound of apples = 3 cups peeled and sliced apples

Bibliography:

N.p., n.d. Web.
http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=15
N.p., n.d. Web.

Why Your Supermarket Sells Only 5 Kinds of Apples


“Best Apples for Baking.” Best Apples Baking Cooking. N.p., n.d. Web. 01 Oct. 2020.
“Apple Harvest.” Graves Mountain Lodge. N.p., n.d. Web. 01 Oct. 2020.
“U.S. Apple Association.” U.S. Apple Association. N.p., n.d. Web. 01 Oct. 2020.




 

Posted in Health, Magazine Issues, Plants, Recipes Tagged with: , , ,

Bee Propolis

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy-Sustainable-Regenerative Lifestyle 

Bee Glue

Propolis or bee glue is a resinous mixture made by honey bees from mixing saliva and beeswax with botanical sources like tree sap. I have found it difficult to remove from the beehive, depending on temperature, when warm it is sticky, and brittle when cold.

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

It is all about the soil!

 

 

 

 


Harvesting Honey Bee Propolis

by David Proctor


 September 24, 2020

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


The propolis at one time was just considered a nuisance since it can make it laborious to get in the hive and do an inspection or to extract honey.

 

Hive Frames
Hive Frames

A few reasons the bees go to so much trouble to make propolis is that they use it to reduce the entrance into the hive, to make it more defensible, they use it to seal cracks or other openings, bees prefer a dark hive, and propolis is used by the bees medicinally.
 
Propolis is one of the most powerful antimicrobial substances found in nature. Not only do bees use it as a building material but also us it to sterilize and disinfect the beehive.

 

Bee Comb

                                                                                                                                                                 Bee Comb

It has been found that the typical composition tends to be approximately “45-55% resins, 25-35% waxes and fatty acids, 10% essential oils and aromatic compounds (phenolics), which includes vanillin and gives the propolis the vanilla-like smell and 5% pollen.”

An additional 5% of the makeup of propolis is “bioflavonoids known as Vitamin P and citrin”.

A few other compounds have not even been able to be identified yet by researchers.

Next are some methods to collect and process propolis.

Traps can be used that are thin plastic sheets with thin slits and placed in the hive instead of the inner cover.

Bees will fill the gaps in with propolis. This can be removed from the trap by putting it in a plastic bag and placing it in a freezer for a few hours.

When taken out, the trap can be twisted or banged on the table while in the plastic bag and most of the propolis will fall down into the bag.

You can use the propolis in this form if you would like. It can be chewed like gum to help with sore throats.

Propolis can also be collected by catching the hive scraping when cleaning out the honey supers during the honey harvest.

Propolis In Hive
Propolis In Hive

Unlike propolis collected from a trap, hive scraping will tend to have other things in it like beeswax, wood, bee parts, etc.

One way the contaminants can be removed from the propolis is by soaking the scraping in a bucket of water.

Most of the contaminants will float and they can be removed.

Another way to clean propolis hive scraping is to place the scraping in an oven-proof container and cover with two to three inches of water.

Place in oven at 200 degrees and bake for two hours, stirring often.

The melted wax and other pieces will float and the propolis will stick to the bottom of the container.

Let cool and pour off the water with the unwanted materials in it and now you have just the propolis on the bottom.

Place the pan in the freezer and when the propolis is brittle it can be removed by chipping it out of the container.

If you want to make a tincture, use the highest quality of grain alcohol, pure alcohol or ethyl alcohol, or any food-grade alcohol that is at least 130 proof (65% alcohol). Never use rubbing alcohol.

Grind the propolis into a powder to give it more surface area for the alcohol, and place alcohol and propolis into a water-tight container, seal, and shake briefly. Shaking should be repeated once or twice a day for over one or two weeks.

The next step is to filter the extract through a paper filter or fine cloth. The result will be a clear liquid, free of particles and dark brown or reddish in color. This can now be bottled.

To make a tincture without alcohol, the propolis can be soaked in water or boiling it in water.

When boiling some of the aromatics may be lost, but this still has and proves to be a powerful bactericidal and fungicidal extract.

An oil extract of propolis may be obtained by filling a pot with propolis and any food-grade oil like coconut oil or even butter.

The contents of the pan are gently heated in a water bath and continually stirred for about ten minutes.

The resulting extract can be filtered and stored in sealed containers in the dark.

Even though the alcohol process results in the most potent extract, it does not mean it will be the best for the use that you need it for.

You should never use an alcohol extract around your eyes and should not be used on individuals with sensitivity to alcohol.

As you can see, the processing of propolis is not very difficult and can be used for many treatments for various ailments.

Honey bees make amazing products besides just honey.

Bees
Bees


Check It Out!

How to make a Propolis Tincture.  7:22


Quick Tip

Health Benefits of Bee Propolis

Health Benefits of Bee Propolis


Bibliography:

Conrad, Ross. “Processing Propolis: Part 1.” Bee Culture –, 26 Sept. 2016, www.beeculture.com/processing-propolis-part-1/.

Everything You Need To Know About Bee Propolis – Comvita USA, www.comvita.com/blog-article/everything-you-need-to-know-about-propolis/W5200215.

“Propolis.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 19 Sept. 2020, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propolis.




 

Posted in Apiary, Health, Magazine Issues, Plants, Recipes Tagged with: ,

Sweet Addictions

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy-Sustainable-Regenerative Lifestyle 

Honey vs Sugar

I have made a conscious decision to stop consuming sugar as much as I can.  With all the sugar in processed foods, I know I am better off avoiding it, as much as possible if not altogether. But what about honey?

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

It is all about the soil!

 

 

 


Honey vs Sugar – Which Is Better For You

by David Proctor


 September 17, 2020

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


I am a beekeeper and I love honey.  Should I feel guilty about still consuming honey while trying to avoid sweets? A little yes and a little no.

 

Sugar Molecule

Sugar Molecule

First, let’s decide why or why not to consume sugar.  Since almost everything you buy to eat in the store or restaurant has sugar in it, do we want to consume more?
 
It is not that the food is bad per se, but that so much of our food that we eat and drink is heavily loaded with sugar, our bodies just can’t handle it.

Honey vs Sugar-Macros

Honey vs Sugar-Macros

We have so many cases of diabetes, obesity, and other medical problems that arise from this overconsumption of sugar that in my opinion I should try and get away from adding sugar or eating additional sugary food.  The health risk is just too great.
 
In a strict comparison between honey and sugar, honey contains less fructose and glucose when we do a comparison to sugar, yet honey has more calories.
 
Processed sugar is higher on the glycemic index than honey.  This means that blood sugar levels can rise more quickly. 

Sugar starts out as a natural product.  Most of our fruits have natural sugar in them. 

The problem arises when one tries to eat a balanced diet with fruit, we end up with too much sugar in our system.
 
When our bodies are overloaded with sugar and the effects of sugar, we end up with the severe short term and long-term health problems.  Does honey have the same effect on our bodies?
 
Honey still has an effect on our body, to some degree like sugar.  Too much consumption can cause health issues. 

The good thing about honey is that honey has beneficial effects more so than sugar.

Vitamins Honey vs Sugar_Micro

Vitamins-Honey vs Sugar_Micro

The problem with honey is that not all honey is the same.  I prefer honey over sugar, even if it is just off the shelf in the store. 

But processed honey has lost a lot of its natural benefits.  Plus, honey off the shelf can be diluted with fructose or corn syrup.
 
Processed honey is heated, so it will have a longer shelf life without crystallization.  It is also filtered so it looks nice and uniform. 

You can still eat honey that has crystallized, I do all the time.

Minerals Honey vs Sugar_Micro

Minerals-Honey vs Sugar_Micro

The nice-looking honey is what most consumers want, and they may not realize that they are buying a product that is not as good for them as it could be.
 
This brings us to what I consider the best type of honey, raw honey. 

This type of honey has many health benefits even over regular shelf honey and definitely over sugar.

Honey vs Raw Honey

Honey vs Raw Honey

You can find honey labeled raw on the shelf along with the other honey products, but this will be heated and filtered. 

The best way to get the most wholesome honey is to buy it from a local beekeeper.
 
You will see pollen in the honey and maybe even a bee wing or two. 

But all the enzymes and nutritional benefits will be in that jar.
 
Remember, you always get what you settle for. 
 
If you want to buy cheap sugar and cheap honey, that is fine. 

Remember most processed food and drink are loaded with high fructose corn syrup which is definitely not good for you. 

Combined with your choice of additional sweeteners, health benefits might be minimal.
 
If you want to follow a healthier route you might have to spend a little bit more upfront to get the short- and long-term health benefits.

Your body, your choice!


Check It Out!

3 Tests to Check if Your Honey is Pure or Fake  3:14


Quick Tip

 

Substituting Honey For Sugar

Substituting Honey For Sugar


Bibliography:

“10 Reasons Why Sugar Is Bad for Your Body.” Atkins, www.atkins.com/how-it-works/library/articles/10-ways-sugar-harms-your-health.

“3 Things You Need to Know About Raw Honey (Buying Tips).” Benefits-of-Honey.com, www.benefits-of-honey.com/raw-honey.html.

“About Us | United States | Burnley Farm Apiary, LLC.” Honey For Sale | United States | Burnley Farm Apiary, LLC, www.burnleyfarmapiary.com/about-us.

“Honey Vs Sugar: A Comparison.” BuzzAboutBees.net, www.buzzaboutbees.net/honey-vs-sugar.html.

“Raw Honey vs Sugar.” Neighborhood Hive, www.neighborhoodhive.com/pages/honey-vs-sugar.

“What Is Sugar?” The Sugar Association, www.sugar.org/sugar/what-is-sugar/.




 

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