Bee Friendly Pest Control

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle

Bee Friendly 

Pesticides are one of the biggest threats to honey bees. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Before using chemicals, try using natural methods of control.

 

David Proctor

 

 
  
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


Bee Friendly Pest Control

by David Proctor


June 14, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


Now that most gardens are going strong, so are the pests. When you want to find a remedy for getting rid of the pests that wants to eat your garden as much as you do. You need an arsenal of weapons.

I came across a good article that helps explain some of the best methods for bee-friendly pest control:

7 Top Methods For Bee-Friendly Pest Control
Written by: Julie C.          Survival Gardening

“Since 1998, scientists, conservationists, and farmers have noticed an alarming trend. European honeybee populations are declining at rapid rates. Researchers believe”…..read more

 

Bees

One method of controlling pests is through Integrated Pest Management or IPM.

IPM is a science-based, decision-making process that integrates pest biology, environmental information, consensus building, and technology to prevent unacceptable levels of pest damage. IPM considers site management goals and strives to minimize risk to people, property, and the environment, including pollinators. If you would like to read more, go to this link to download a pdf   Reducing Risks to Pollinators from Pest Control  by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

Another good article that I will post here is by the  Great Pollinator Project

 

Natural Garden Pest Control

Natural Garden Pest Control

“Land mangers, urban farmers, and home gardeners are often faced with pest control decisions, including whether to use chemicals and if so, which”….read more, please click the link above. 

————————-

To summarize, plan ahead for what type of plants will be grown close together. And mix it up, so the pests are not coming to a buffet.

Use methods that do not affect the pollinators while they are at work.

If you think you need to use chemicals, then read the label very closely. Apply chemicals in the evening and not to blooms, but at base of the plants and stems.

Some plants are natural insecticides, try to mingle these into your garden.

Encourage the beneficial insects to help do your work like the Ladybug and Praying Mantis. Remove pests by hand or with a misting bottle and water.

You will probably not use just one method to control pests, but just remember if it “Kills Bugs Dead” it will probable kill all bugs, including the ones that make your garden healthy.


Check It Out!

 

Companion Planting


Quick Tip

  • Thin out the weak plants. That will help provide more root area for the strong and not attract pests to the weak plants. Often, those pests will then move over to infest  the strong ones.                                                            
  • Water at night or early morning so the plants can dry.  Plants can bake with water on them during the day and weaken them.                                                                                               
  • Set traps and/or lures for unwanted pests.  This can help control without using as much spray.
  •  Help out the good insects like Lady Bugs, Praying Mantis, and Lacewings which can be encouraged by planting herbs like basil, dill and cilantro.  They like to lay eggs in these plants and the larva will have something to eat.                                                                                                                                                       
  • Diversify the plants in your garden to throw the pests off.  Also, mix in garlic and onions to help repel unwanted pests.                                                                                                       
  • Rotate plantings each year so one pest does not get a foothold by eating it’s favorite food.

Bibliography:

C., Julie. “7 Top Methods For Bee-Friendly Pest Control.” Off The Grid News. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 July 2016. <http://www.offthegridnews.com/survival-gardening-2/7-top-methods-for-bee-friendly-pest-control/>.

“Pest Management.” Great Pollinator Project. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 July 2016. <http://greatpollinatorproject.org/management/pest-management>.

 


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Posted in Apiary, Health, Magazine Issues, Plants Tagged with:

Got Raw Milk?

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle

Got Raw Milk?

With all the concerns over processed food and if it is good for you or not, one food item seems to have more debate about being processed than any other, milk.
Is organic milk, that has been pasteurized, really organic?

David Proctor

 

 
  
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


Is Pasteurized Organic Milk, Really Organic?

by David Proctor


June 7, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


When I was very young I can remember being on the farm and watching my grandparents milk the cows.

Milk Cows

Proctor Farm in Trenton, MO – 1960

The milk cows would be lined up outside the barn door anxiously waiting to be milked. They would then come in the barn and go to their stalls or stanchions where a wooden bar would slide over about 15 degrees and a wooden block would be placed to keep the bar next to the cows neck and the head secured.

The cows always went to the same stall. Grain would be placed in an area where the cow could eat while the milking process started.  I can remember that the udders would be cleaned and then the milking machine would be strapped on and the process of collecting milk would proceed. 

Cows Going To Be Milked

Proctor Farm in Trenton, MO  – 1960

The milk would then be poured into a metal milk can. The lid would be hammered on and then the can lifted and placed into the cold water bath that would chill the milk until the milk truck came to collect the cans.

After my grandpa passed away and it was just my grandma doing the milking, she only would milk a cow for herself.  She would go through the same process except she would sit down on a one legged stool and milk by hand.  She was very good at it and very fast.  She could even aim and squirt milk into a cat’s mouth, which the barn cats loved.

Grandma would take the pail of milk into the farm house and place the milk in the refrigerator.  When we had milk to drink with our meals, the metal cups that we drank out of would have the cream globules along the inside of the cups even though grandma had separated the cream from the milk.  The milk was never heated, just chilled and we would drink it.

My mom would tell me that I did not have to drink the milk.  My grandma had always drank the milk and what was good enough for her was definitely good enough for me.

I can remember in high school that I would go through gallons of milk a week.  We always had milk at school, everyone drank milk.

Milk
Times have changed, now instead of milk it is safer to have soda at school for kids to drink since they may be lactose intolerant.  I’m sure you can still get milk with your meals, I’m just not sure how many choose milk over soda.But this brings me to my point, is milk the best choice?And if it is, should one choose raw milk (which is not available with school lunches) over pasteurized milk.
Few articles have I researched that have such strong opinions over the pros and cons of a subject as does raw milk.The FDA and the CDC pretty much state that there is no reason to drink raw milk because of the harm it can potentially do to you.  Yet on the other side of the coin you can find arguments that state the benefits of raw milk and all the reasons why you should drink it.
Abraham Lincoln - Creator of The USDA
Abraham Lincoln – Creator of The USDA

As you can tell by some of my writings that I believe that natural is better than processed.  In this case I will let you form your own opinion.I will start with what the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or CDC and the questions they have with answers on their website then follow with rebuttals.

What is raw milk?
CDC:
Raw milk is milk from cows, goats, sheep, or other animals that has not been pasteurized. Although precise data are not available, it is thought that less than 1% of milk sold to consumers in the United States has not been pasteurized.

http://www.realmilk.com/
Weston A. Price Foundation:
“Real milk is milk that comes from pastured cows, that contains all the fat and that has not been processed in any way—it is raw and unhomogenized”

Does pasteurization change milk’s nutritional benefits?
CDC:
No. Many studies have shown that pasteurization does not significantly change the nutritional value of milk and dairy products. All of the nutritional benefits of drinking milk are available from pasteurized milk without the risk of disease that comes with drinking raw milk.

https://draxe.com/raw-milk-benefits/
Dr. AXE:
“Dairy products have gotten a bad rap over years because of the pasteurization process.  When milk is pasteurized it destroys many of the nutrients that make raw milk beneficial.
According to medical studies the following nutrients that are destroyed or altered during pasteurization include”:

Nutrient and Immune Factors  Pasteurized Milk  Raw Milk
  Vitamin A   35% Reduction   100% Active
  Vitamin C   25 to 77% Reduction   100% Active
  Vitamin E   14% Reduction   100% Active
  Iron   66% Reduction   100% Active
  Zinc   70% Reduction   100% Active
  B-Complex Vitamins   38% Reduction   100% Active
  Calcium   21% Reduction   100% Active
  Enzymes   100% Destroyed   100% Active
  Immunoglobulins   Damaged   100% Active
  Whey Protein   Denatured   100% Active

Aren’t raw or natural foods better than processed foods?

CDC:
Many people believe that foods with no or minimal processing are better for their health. Many people also believe that small, local farms are better sources of healthy food. However, some types of processing are needed to protect health. For example, consumers process raw meat, poultry, and fish for safety by cooking. Similarly, when milk is pasteurized, it is heated just long enough to kill disease-causing germs. Most nutrients remain after milk is pasteurized. There are many local, small farms that offer pasteurized organic milk and cheese products.

http://www.realmilk.com/
Weston A. Price Foundation:
“It is very difficult to determine the risk of drinking raw milk on a per-serving basis compared to pasteurized milk and to other foods.  For starters, the risk of illness from all dairy foods, raw and pasteurized, is very low compared to other foods—amounting to only 1 percent of all illnesses.
A government document published in 2003 indicates that on a per-serving basis, deli meats are ten times more likely to cause food-borne illness than raw.”

Does drinking raw milk prevent or cure any diseases, such as asthma, allergies, heart disease, or cancer?

CDC:
No. There are no health benefits from drinking raw milk that cannot be obtained from drinking pasteurized milk that is free of disease-causing bacteria. The process of pasteurization of milk has never been found to be the cause of chronic diseases, allergies, or developmental or behavioral problems.

https://draxe.com/raw-milk-benefits/
Dr.Axe:
“Probiotics are only found in small amounts in raw milk but when you ferment raw milk to make kefir, yogurt or cheese the good bacteria dramatically increases.  In fact, there are no other foods in the world as high in probiotics as cultured dairy products.

Probiotics are microorganisms that line your gut and support nutrient absorption and protect you from foreign invaders like E. coli and parasites. The best way to include probiotics in your diet is in their most natural state, which includes raw milk products such as cheese, kefir and yogurt. Some disorders probiotic rich foods are known to help with include”:

  • Colon cancer
  • Diarrhea
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Intestinal infections
  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Skin infections
  • Weakened immune system
  • Urinary track infections
  • Vaginal yeast infections

My farmer’s raw milk is organic, so isn’t it safe?
CDC:
Raw organic milk is not safe. Pasteurized organic milk is available in many places, including supermarkets, farmers’ markets, and dairies.

 http://nourishedkitchen.com/10-reasons-drink-raw-milk/
by Jenny:
“When you purchase pasteurized milk at the store – unless you’re careful about your brand – you’re purchasing it from industrial farms that promote poor health among their herd.
By contrast, raw milk is not produced on a massive, concentrated scale.   Instead, raw milk producers operate small operations with fewer cattle spread out over a larger amount of space.   Cows aren’t fed on feedlot grain; rather, they’re given space on fresh pasture and spend their time outside with access to shelter when they need it – as in the case of inclement weather.   By choosing to drink raw milk and eschew pasteurized milk, you’re supporting small, local farmers who value both their customers and their herd.   You’re supporting sustainable agricultural operations not the dairy mega-industry.”

As you can see, a difference in opinion exist.  I am not here to tell you to drink raw milk, that is a decision you have to make or the government probably has already made that decision for you.  If you are thinking about drinking raw milk, then be informed and know the risk.  When I drank raw milk on the farm I had my grandma looking out for my best interest, you will unlikely find that kind of love at the farmer’s market.

“Eating is said to be an agricultural act with political consequences”


Check It Out!

Raw Milk Laws

 

USFoodandDrugAdmin
Published on Feb 23, 2012
The Dangers of Unpasteurized Milk

Real Milk
The Weston A Price
Published on Dec 10, 2015


Quick Tip

What are the risks associated with drinking raw milk?

Raw milk can carry harmful bacteria and other germs that can make you very sick or kill you. While it is possible to get foodborne illnesses from many different foods, raw milk is one of the riskiest of all.

Getting sick from raw milk can mean many days of diarrhea, stomach cramping, and vomiting. Less commonly, it can mean kidney failure, paralysis, chronic disorders, and even death.

Many people who chose raw milk thinking they would improve their health instead found themselves (or their loved ones) sick in a hospital for several weeks fighting for their lives from infections caused by germs in raw milk. For example, a person can develop severe or even life-threatening diseases, such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, which can cause paralysis, and hemolytic uremic syndrome, which can result in kidney failure and stroke.

And some of those same things and worse can be said about eating green vegetables from industrial farms.


Bibliography:

“Raw Milk Questions and Answers.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 20 Feb. 2015. Web. 28 June 2016. <http://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/rawmilk/raw-milk-questions-and-answers.html>.

“Raw Milk State Laws and Regulations – Real Raw Milk Facts.” Raw Milk State Laws and Regulations – Real Raw Milk Facts. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 June 2016. <http://www.realrawmilkfacts.com/raw-milk-regulations>.

“Raw Milk Benefits Skin, Allergies and Weight Loss – DrAxe.com.” Dr Axe. N.p., 13 Mar. 2014. Web. 28 June 2016. <https://draxe.com/raw-milk-benefits/>.

“10 Reasons to Drink Your Milk Raw.” Nourished Kitchen. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 June 2016. <http://nourishedkitchen.com/10-reasons-drink-raw-milk/>.

“Home: THE FACTS ABOUT REAL RAW MILK – A Campaign for Real Milk.”A Campaign for Real Milk. N.p., 01 Jan. 2000. Web. 28 June 2016. <http://www.realmilk.com/>.

“Should You Drink Raw Milk?” Prevention. N.p., 13 Jan. 2015. Web. 28 June 2016. <http://www.prevention.com/food/healthy-eating-tips/risks-and-benefits-raw-milk>.

Walters, Chris, and Joseph Heckman. “Raw Milk For Real Health, Wealth.” Acres U.S.A.com, June 2018, www.acresusa.com/.


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Posted in Animal Husbandry, Health, Magazine Issues Tagged with: ,

Kale

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle

Kale

Kale has been touted as one of the healthiest foods we can eat. When we think of our health we need to be careful of semantics. What is healthy and what is nutritious can be a whole different matter. This is a look at kale and its benefits to our diet.

David Proctor

 

 
  
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


Kale – The Super Food

by David Proctor


May 31, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


I never ate Kale when I was growing up, at least that I can remember. We use to eat a lot of different vegetables but I never really had heard of kale until a few years ago.

I decided to see what kale is all about and determine if it should be added to my families diet on a regular basis.

First to define what kale is. According to Wikipedia: Kale or leaf cabbage is a group of vegetable cultivars within the plant species Brassica oleracea. They have green or purple leaves, in which the central leaves do not form a head.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kale

Research shows that kale can help lower cholesterol and has other medicinal benefits as outlined in the article Kale by George Mateljan. 
To read more click this link to his article: http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=38

"Worlds Healthiest Food"
From “Worlds Healthiest Foods.org”

I came across another article while investigating the benefits of kale that was written in the Washington Post. 

According to the article: No food is healthy. Not even kale. By Michael Ruhlman, we should really watch our words that are used to describe what is healthy and what is nutritious for our bodies.

I have talked about how the food industry labels their products and how sometimes a misunderstanding can come about if we are not careful about what we think we have read on the label.

Wonder Bread
Wonder Bread

To read more about what Michael has written in his article No food is healthy.  Not even kale.  Click the link: https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/food/no-food-is-healthy-not-even-kale/2016/01/15/4a5c2d24-ba52-11e5-829c-26ffb874a18d_story.html

There are a lot of foods that we can consume for the nutritional qualities and health benefits that our body needs, but kale ranks high on the list as a “superfood“.

Give it a try as part of your diet, combine kale with your salads or as a dish on its own. Your body will love you for it.


Check It Out!

 

10 Proven Benefits of Kale (No. 1 is Very Impressive)

By Kris Gunnars, BSc | April, 2016 |

1. Kale is among the most nutrient dense foods on the planet
2. Kale is loaded with powerful antioxidants like quercetin and kaempferol
3. It is an excellent source of Vitamin C
4. Kale can help lower cholesterol, which may reduce the risk of heart disease
5. Kale is one of the world’s best sources of Vitamin K
6. There are numerous cancer-fighting substances in kale
7. Kale is very high in beta-carotene
8. Kale is a good source of minerals that most people don’t get enough of
9. Kale is high in lutein and zeaxanthin, powerful nutrients that protect the eyes
10. Kale should be able to help you lose weight

https://authoritynutrition.com/10-proven-benefits-of-kale/


Quick Tip

 

Tips for Preparing and Cooking Kale:

Rinse kale leaves under cold running water. Chop leaf portion into 1/2″ slices and
the stems into 1/4″ lengths for quick and even cooking.

To get the most health benefits from kale, let sit for a minimum of 5 minutes before cooking. Sprinkling with lemon juice before letting them sit can further enhance its beneficial phytonutrient concentration.

The Healthiest Way of Cooking Kale:

We recommend  steaming kale for maximum nutrition and flavor.
Fill the bottom of a steamer pot with 2 inches of water. While waiting for the water to come to a rapid boil chop greens. Steam for 5 minutes and toss.

How to Enjoy:

A Few Quick Serving Ideas…

Braise chopped kale and apples. Before serving, sprinkle with balsamic vinegar and chopped walnuts.
Combine chopped kale, pine nuts, and feta cheese with whole grain pasta drizzled with olive oil.

The George Mateljan Foundation
http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=38


Bibliography:

“Kale.” Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, n.d. Web. 31 May 2016.

“Kale.” Kale. The George Mateljan Foundation, n.d. Web. 31 May 2016.

Ruhlman, Michael. “No Food Is Healthy. Not Even Kale.” Washington Post. The Washington Post, 17 Jan. 2016. Web. 31 May 2016.

Gunnars, Kris. “10 Proven Benefits of Kale (No. 1 Is Very Impressive).” RSS 20. N.p., 28 Oct. 2014. Web. 31 May 2016.


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Posted in Health, Magazine Issues Tagged with:

Aches and Pains

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle

Aches & Pains

Many of our aches and pains can be attributed to our dietary intake.  Salt, Sugar, and Fat are the three biggest culprits. We are what we eat.

David Proctor

 

 
  
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 

 


Aches & Pains

by David Proctor


May 24, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


It is not easy to limit the intake of unhealthy nutrients due to the abundance that they are used in processed foods and prepared foods from restaurants.

The change that the FDA has made for food labels was scheduled to go into enforcement this year, but may have some delays.  The good thing about the new label requirements is that they will at least, to some degree, give the general public a means to make decisions on food purchases and intake.

New Nutrition FDA Label
New Nutrition FDA Label

How many people do you know that are over the age of fifty that are not on some type of medication?  The number gets even higher once you look at the population that is over sixty.  The sad truth of the matter is how many young adults and children are on medications to relieve symptoms.

I believe that we have been persuaded to try and take the easy way out and that is to take a pill for what ails you.  The truth be known, if we concentrated on the cause of the symptom, we would all live a better life with few if any symptoms.

It is hard to cut out the food that we eat that is not good for us.  We are fighting a very hard battle against some of the brightest scientists in the country that have as a job, to get us to eat more food.

Ever tried to eat one or two potato chips then put them away?  We see it all the time in marketing, the way a Snickers can change your personality, how a drink is your reward for the hard day you put in, how you can bond with your child by eating cereal with them and the list goes on.

FDA Food Serving Sizes
FDA Food Serving Sizes

I point out some of these examples to illustrate how things can be stacked against your willpower, if we let them into our inner psyche.

I have found great difficulty in cutting out or even cutting back on some of the food items that contain salt, sugar, and fat.  I love potato chips, Snickers, chocolate chip cookies and the list goes on.

I found myself gaining weight. I knew the reason, I was eating too many sweets.  I thought not a big deal, I’m older I can do as I want.  Not the case, besides the weight gain, I started to notice my knees starting to ache. It was not easy but I have tried to stop or at least limit my sugar intake.  The ache in the knees has gone away and in a few weeks, I dropped nine pounds.

Scale
Scale

The point I would like to make is that what we consume has a great deal to do with our health.  If effort is made to at least notice or have a conscience awareness of what we are eating and drinking then maybe we can curtail the causes instead of the symptoms of ill health.

Simply increasing the amount of green vegetables, fruit and berries can have a huge difference in how we feel.  If you notice that you have trouble making it up a few flights of stairs and then have trouble with your knees, try cutting out sugar.  Sugar can really cause problems with inflammation, which is what is causing the aches you feel.

Having trouble with blood pressure? Cut salt, sugar and fat.  You and your doctor will see a huge difference.

If it’s easy it’s probably bad for you, if it’s hard, then it might be good for you.  It is easy to take a pill, it’s hard to change your lifestyle.  Lifestyle is what I say we need to change.  The Urban Farm Lifestyle.


Check It Out!

Michael Moss "A Fast Food Nation"

Michael Moss “A Fast Food Nation”


Salt Sugar Fat | Michael Moss speaks out  3:16


Quick Tip

 

The key to avoiding aches and pains is not medications but eating healthy, real food.

A simple calculation to see how much sugar you are consuming:

4 grams of carbohydrates = 1 teaspoon of sugar in your body

(When you check product labels, be sure to verify the serving size so you complete the calculation for the amount of food or beverage you want to consume.)


Bibliography:

“Sugar Aches & Inflammation | Nutritional Weight & Wellness.” Nutritional Weight and Wellness. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 May 2017.
Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. “Labeling & Nutrition – Changes to the Nutrition Facts Label.” U S Food and Drug Administration Home Page. Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, n.d. Web. 15 May 2017.


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Posted in Health, Magazine Issues Tagged with: , , , ,

Permaculture

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle

What Is Permaculture?

Permaculture is agriculture that is focused on utilizing natural design of ecosystems instead of focusing on individual elements. The emphasis is to work with nature not against it. The goal is to achieve not just a sustainable platform, but also a regenerative ecosystem, and when in balance uses less resources and energy.

 

David Proctor

 

 
  
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


Permaculture

by David Proctor


May 17, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


Permaculture is a system of agricultural and social design principles centered around simulating or directly utilizing the patterns and features observed in natural ecosystemshttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Permaculture

Zones
Permaculture Zones 0-5
Illustration: Felix Mulle(www.zukunft-selbermachen.de) License: CC-BYOSA 40
Permaculture 101 by Rodale’s Organic Life
“How to put natural landscaping practices to use in your own backyard.”“Combining the best of natural landscaping and edible gardening, permaculture systems sustain both themselves and their caregivers.The ultimate purpose of permaculture—a word coined in the mid-1970s by two Australians, Bill Mollison and David Holmgren—is to develop a site until it meets all the needs of its inhabitants, from food and shelter to fuel and entertainment.While it’s the rare home gardener who can follow permaculture principles to the ultimate degree, most can borrow ideas from the permaculture ethos with landscaping techniques based on production and usefulness.”

Growing Vertical
Saved from permaculture.co.uk

“Permaculture emphasizes the use of native plants or those that are well adapted to your locale. The goal here is to plant things you like, while making sure they have a purpose and benefit the landscape in some way. Plants such as fruit trees provide food as well as shade; a patch of bamboo could provide stakes for supporting pole beans and other vining plants.

Permaculture gardeners grow many types of perennial food plants—such as arrowhead, sorrel, chicory, and asparagus—in addition to standard garden vegetables.”

“Like all gardeners, permaculture enthusiasts love plants for their beauty and fragrance, but they seek out plants that offer practical benefits along with aesthetic satisfaction. Instead of a border of flowering shrubs, for instance, a permaculture site would make use of a raspberry or blackberry border.”

Permaculture Guidelines

There is no set formula for developing this type of design, but there are best practices.

1. Copy nature’s blueprint and enhance it with useful plants and animals. Think of the structure of a forest and try to mimic it with your plantings.

A canopy of tall trees will give way to smaller ones, flanked by large and small shrubs and, finally, by the smallest plants.

Edge habitats, where trees border open areas, are perfect for fruiting shrubs, such as currants, and for a variety of useful native plants, such as beargrass (xerophyllum tenax), which is used for weaving baskets. Mimicking these natural patterns provides for the greatest diversity of plants.

2. Stack plants into guilds. A guild includes plants with compatible roots and canopies that might be layered to form an edge.

As you learn more about your site, you’ll discover groups of plants that work well together. For example, pines, dogwoods, and wild blueberries form a guild for acid soil.

3. Make use of native plants and others adapted to the site.

4. Divide your yard into zones based on use. Place heavily used features, such as an herb garden, in the most accessible zones.

5. Identify microclimates in your yard and use them appropriately. Cold, shady corners; windswept spots in full sun; and other microclimates present unique opportunities. For instance, try sun-loving herbs like creeping thyme on rocky outcroppings; plant elderberries in poorly drained areas.”

I am new to the concept of permaculture so I let others tell the story.  What I get out of this is to let nature take the lead and realize that by observation nature is self-sustaining and regenerative. I decided to start this regenerative approach in my own one-third acre urban farm. You may have noticed that I changed the tag line on the newsletter to Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle. I hope to not just sustain but to increase.

Check It Out!

 

One Chicken

One Chicken


Quick Tip

 

 


Bibliography:

“Permaculture.” Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, n.d. Web. 17 May 2016.

“Permaculture 101.” Rodale’s Organic Life. N.p., 2 June 2015. Web. 17 May 2016.

“Permaculture Principles – Thinking Tools for an Era of Change.”Permaculture Principles. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 May 2016.


 

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Posted in Animal Husbandry, Apiary, Chickens, fish, Health, Magazine Issues, Plants Tagged with:

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