Benefits of Coconut Oil

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle

 

 

Benefits of Coconut Oil

Coconut oil is one of the most convenient, versatile products to have in your house. Whether you’re eating it or making it into a hand cream, this stuff works. I invite you to read further and see how coconut oil can be a healthy addition to your diet, but also a lifesaver to have around the house.

 

 

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


Benefits of Coconut Oil

by Kelsey Proctor

Urban Farmers

Urban Farmers

UFL Facebook Messenger Channel https://m.me/UrbanFarmLifestyle


November 8, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


Coconut oil is one of the most convenient, versatile products to have in your house. Whether you’re eating it or making it into a hand cream, this stuff works. I invite you to read further and see how coconut oil can be a healthy addition to your diet, but also a lifesaver to have around the house.

 

Up until the past decade, healthy and coconut oil were not used in the same sentence. This versatile oil was thought of as only a saturated fat no-no. How wrong we were! Now the buzz is all about how this healthy fat can be used in cooking, beauty products, cleaning products, and more. Coconut oil has hundreds of uses outside of just cooking.

 

First off: how is this new superfood healthy to consume? Coconut oil is almost 90 percent saturated fat; however, that fat is mostly lauric acid. Lauric acid consists of medium-chain triglycerides (an MCT) which are metabolized easier than longer chains found in meat and dairy products. This metabolism boost means instant energy, and can actually help you lose weight.

 

As a point of reference, Bruce Fife (C.N., N.D.), author of The Coconut Oil Miracle, recommends consuming 1-3 tablespoons of coconut oil daily. Coconut oil is a healthy fat, but is high in calories (about 117 a tablespoon) so consider your diet and lifestyle when deciding what the right amount is for you.

 

So, now that you know how great coconut oil is for your diet, there are a few things to look for when buying your first jar. In my fridge, I have a jar of Simply Nature Organic Coconut Oil I grabbed from the grocery store for $4.99.

 

Simply Nature Coconut Oil

Simply Nature Coconut Oil


Check It Out!

 

Now the fun part: ways to use coconut oil outside of just cooking!

Face Mask

Face Mask


Quick Tip

The Top Three things to look for when buying coconut oil:

  1. Unrefined – this means there hasn’t been any bleaching or stripping that would compromise the oil’s health benefits.
  2. Virgin (tip: unlike with olive oil, you’re not going to find a discernible difference between “virgin” and extra virgin”).
  3. Good price! There’s no reason to drop tons of dough on coconut oil anymore. It’s become such a frequently bought product that you can purchase a 14 oz jar for anywhere from $5-$10 depending on the brand and your area. My 14oz jar will last me all winter! 

 


Bibliography:

How much coconut oil per day?. (2015, November 2). Retrieved from
http://www.newhealthguide.org/How-Much-Coconut-Oil-Per-Day.html

Kadey, M. (2013, September 16). Everything you need to know about coconut oil. Retrieved from http://www.shape.com/healthy-eating/cooking-ideas/everything-you-need-know-about-coconut-oil

Michaelis, K. (2015). How to choose a good coconut oil. Retrieved from http://www.foodrenegade.com/how-to-choose-a-good-coconut-oil/

 




 

Posted in Health, Magazine Issues, Plants, Recipes Tagged with: , ,

How To Make Eucalyptus Oil

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle

Eucalyptus Oil

If you’re interested in natural living and homeopathic solutions, chances are you’re conscious about the ingredients in the products you choose.  Learn more about making your own Eucalyptus Oil.

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 

 


How To Make Eucalyptus Oil

by Kelsey Proctor

Urban Farmers

Urban Farmers

UFL Facebook Messenger Channel https://m.me/UrbanFarmLifestyle


November 1, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


One of the best ways to control what’s in your products, is to make them yourself. Let me introduce eucalyptus oil; an essential oil derived from the eucalyptus leaf, and used throughout history for medicinal and industrial purposes.

You can make eucalyptus oil yourself by boiling, then straining, the leaves and twigs of the leaf. Essential oils have become popular because of the increased attention on homeopathic living. If you don’t want to bother making your own, you can find eucalyptus oil at a drugstore or local health food store.

Eucalyptus oil can be used as an antiseptic for cuts, burns, and bug bites. In fact, dilute the oil with water and spray on as a natural bug repellant. Eucalyptus oil is not just for medicinal purposes, place a few droplets in a diffuser to destress and improve concentration.

Eucalyptus oil is effective at improving allergies, alleviating respiratory viruses, and reducing inflammation in the lungs. Eucalyptus oil is one of the active ingredients in the common topical cream Vick’s VapoRub. However, you can make your own chest decongestant rub with natural ingredients.

You will need:
·         10 drops of eucalyptus oil
·         10 drops of peppermint oil
·         5 drops of preferred essential oil such as lemon or lavender
·         ¼ cup Beeswax
·         ¼ cup coconut oil or olive oil

Directions:
·         Melt Beeswax and coconut oil
·         Remove from heat for 5 minutes
·         Stir in essential oils
·         Cool and pour into desired containers

Continue reading below to learn more ways to utilize eucalyptus oil in your healthy home!


Check It Out!

 

How to Make Eucalyptus Oil

  1. Gather two mason jars
  2. Gather eucalyptus leaves
  3. Pour the oil over the smashed eucalyptus leaves and salt mix
  4. Strain leaves from oil by pouring through a tea strainer or cheesecloth
  5. Label the eucalyptus oil

 

http://www.wikihow.com/Make-Eucalyptus-Oil

 


Quick Tip

Eucalyptus oil guide - Dr. Axe

https://draxe.com/eucalyptus-oil-uses-benefits/


Bibliography:

Ellelmd. “Make Eucalyptus Oil.” WikiHow. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Sept. 2016.

Kimberly. Kimberly’s Cup. 28 October 2009. Web. 24 September 2016.
Mercola.com. 12 May 2016. Web. 24 September 2016.




Posted in Health, Magazine Issues, Plants, Recipes Tagged with:

Pumpkins

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle

 

Pumpkins

What makes a pumpkin great, besides raising up out of the pumpkin patch for Linus in the Charlie Brown cartoon, is its nutritional and decorative aspects? Sorry about that Linus.

 

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 


Pumpkins

by David Proctor

UFL Facebook Messenger Channel https://m.me/UrbanFarmLifestyle


October 25, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


One of the fun activities around Halloween is pumpkin carving.  I have seen some really creative and scary pumpkins come out of my house.

Pumpkin nutrition facts

The following is from nutrition and you.

“Pumpkin is one of the most widely grown vegetables, incredibly rich in vital antioxidants, and vitamins.

Though this humble backyard vegetable is low in calories, it carries vitamin A, and flavonoid poly-phenolic antioxidants such as lutein, xanthin, and carotenes in abundance.

Pumpkin is a fast-growing vine that creeps along the surface in a similar fashion like that of other Cucurbitaceae family vegetables and fruits such as cucumber, squash, cantaloupes…etc.

It is one of the most popular field crops cultivated around the world, including in the USA at commercial scale for its fruit, and seeds.Pumpkins vary greatly in shape, size and colors. Giant pumpkins generally weigh 8–13 lbs with the largest capable of reaching a weight of over 55 lbs.

heirloom pumpkin

Golden-nugget pumpkins are flat, smaller and feature sweet creamy orange color flesh.Pumpkins, in general, feature orange or yellow outer skin color; however, some varieties can exhibit dark to pale green, brown, white, red and gray.

heirloom pumpkin
Their color characteristics is largely influenced by yellow-orange pigments in their skin and pulp. Its thick rind is smooth with light, vertical ribs.
pumpkin muffins

In structure, the fruit features golden-yellow to orange flesh depending upon the poly-phenolic pigments in it. The fruit has a hollow center, with numerous small, off-white colored seeds interspersed in a net like structure.”

Saving Pumpkin Seeds

  1. Remove the pulp and seeds from inside the pumpkin. Place this in a colander.
  2. Place the colander under running water. As the water runs over the pulp, start picking out the seeds from the pulp. Rinse them in the running water as you pick them out. Do not let the pumpkin pulp sit in non-running water.
  3. There will be more seeds inside the pumpkin than you’re going to need to use, so once you have a good amount of seeds rinsed, look over them and choose the biggest seeds. Plan on saving 3 times more pumpkin seeds than the number of plants you will be growing next year. Larger seeds will have a better chance of germinating.
  4. Place the rinsed seeds on a dry paper towel. Make sure they are spaced out; otherwise, the seeds will stick to one another.
  5. Place in a cool dry spot for one week.
  6. Once the seeds are dry, store pumpkin seed for planting in an envelope.”

Properly Store Pumpkin Seeds for Planting

“When saving pumpkin seeds, you also need to store them so that they will be ready to plant for next year. Any seeds, pumpkin or otherwise, will store best if you keep them somewhere cold and dry.

One of the best places to store pumpkin seed for planting next year is in your refrigerator. Put your pumpkin seed envelope in a plastic container. Place several holes in the lid of the container to ensure that condensation does not build up on the inside. Place the container with the seeds inside at the very back of the fridge.

Next year, when it comes time for planting pumpkin seeds, your pumpkin seeds will be ready to go. Saving pumpkin seeds is a fun activity for the whole family, as even the smallest hand can help. And, after you properly store pumpkin seeds for planting, children can also help plant the seeds in your garden.”

As you can see The Great Pumpkin has many uses, from decoration, to healthy snacks and desserts. You can make pumpkin bread, pumpkin cheesecake, pumpkin cookies and the list goes on. Save your seeds and grow some pumpkins this next year, they are easy to grow and the benefits from the plant make it worthwhile.


Check It Out!

 

 

Professional Pumpkin Carver Jonathan Barwood Gives Carving Advice  4:06
The Oregonian
Published on Oct 29, 2015 


Quick Tip

 

Tips for Growing Great Heirloom Organic Pumpkins

The following quick tip is from Sustainable Seed Co.:

“Heirloom Pumpkins do not like wet, soggy soil. 

Heirloom pumpkins aren’t too fussy, but if you want really big pumpkins you should add lots of great composted manure under each hill of pumpkins. 

We dig large holes out about the size of a beach ball and replace it with rich composted humus. To that we may add a hand full of bone meal and blood meal. 

We stir this up really well and use the remaining soil to make our hill. It is on top of this hill we will plant our pumpkin seed. 

Organic pumpkins are deep-rooted, water-conserving plants and should be watered deeply and infrequently to encourage good vine and root growth.

Remember organic pumpkins can ramble up to 12′ so give them plenty of space.”

http://sustainableseedco.com/pumpkin/


Bibliography:
“How To Harvest And Store Pumpkin Seeds.” Gardening Know How. N.p., 30 Aug. 2008. Web. 19 Oct. 2015.

“Pumpkin Heirloom Seeds.” Heirloom Pumpkin Seeds. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Oct. 2015.

“Pumpkin Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits.” Nutrition And You.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Oct. 2015.

All photographs are copyrighted under Proctor Company Incorporated, can not be used without permission.




 

Posted in Magazine Issues, Plants Tagged with: ,

Leaf Composting

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle

 

 

Leaf Composting

Autumn is here and the leaves are starting to change color. Most will think; great, now I have to rake or blow the leaves again and then get rid of them.  Why not compost those leaves?

 

 

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 

 


Leaf Composting

by David Proctor

UFL Facebook Messenger Channel https://m.me/UrbanFarmLifestyle


October 11, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


Autumn is here and soon we will be putting our rakes into action. Once the leaves have been raked up what do you do with them?
 
When I drive around and see all the large leaf bags at the curbside waiting to be picked up to go to the landfill, I cannot help but think, “What a waste!”.
 
I have two thoughts when raking leaves:

  1. Why rake the leaves to begin with?
  2. Why are you trying to get rid of them?

I have always loved being out in the fall. I enjoy walking through the leaves and enjoying the colors against an intense blue sky as a backdrop. But, as the leaves fall we all feel that every last one needs to be picked up and disposed of.

 

Compost Gold

Compost Gold

Leaves, as it turns out, are one of nature’s best compost materials or compost gold for your plants. They are dense in nutrients that have been collected by the trees that they fell from.
 
It is nature’s way of mining for nutrients deep in the earth through tree roots, which then travel up to the leaves.  The only thing the tree does not do for us is mulch the leaves!
 
Do not dispose of the leaves, instead you should try to collect as many as you can. Even take them from your neighbor if they do not want them. You will never have enough.
 
Once these leaves compost down, the volume will be a fraction of what they are when first collected.
 
I very seldom will rake leaves, it just goes against my grain. It’s frustrating that the pile of leaves gets bigger and harder to move as you rake. 
 
Instead I like to mow over the leaves and let them spread over the yard as a natural ground cover. If you do this for a few years you will have fewer dandelions and crab grass.
 
Use a grass catcher to collect and then dump the mulched leaves if you would like to save them for your garden and flower plots.
 
You will find that the pile is a fraction of the size of one created by raking, and they tend to not want to blow away like a pile created by raking and no mulching.

Leaf Mold

 Leaf Mold

Another method is to use your leaf blower. Instead of blowing the leaves, use the attachment that is probably still brand new (because you could not for life of you figure out why anyone would use a perfectly good leaf blower), to instead suck the leaves up into a bag.
 
When the leaf blower is used in this fashion, it has a blade that will mulch the leaves before they go in the bag.
 
Take these mulched leaves and put them in an area that can be contained, such as a wire mesh or a walled off area. This way the leaves will not be disturbed by strong winds, but are still accessible to rotate.
 
This is for an open but contained composting method.

Compost Pile

Compost Pile

The leaf compost pile will need access to oxygen for the aerobic process to continue. If you use a closed system, where oxygen is not accessible, that is called anaerobic.
 
Anaerobic is a process that I will talk about in a future article. For now, we will look at the benefits of the oxygen, or aerobic, process.
 
The one thing that is really good to add to the leaf pile is coffee grounds. Coffee grounds will add nitrogen and will help the plants with warding off disease. Coffee does not appear to add acidity as one might think.
 
This is probably due to most of the acids being removed during brewing. So, save your coffee grounds for the leaf mulch.
 
The one thing I have not recommended for the leaf mulch pile is the kitchen scrapes. Which we all think will be great for the mulch pile, right?
 
Hold on a minute! Those kitchen scrapes are not going to add much to the mulch pile. You are much better off using them in a different mulch pile, preferably one which uses worms to break down the mulch or compost.
 
This doesn’t mean that you will not have worms in a leaf mulch pile, but if you are feeding worms for worm castings, then that is the place to put the kitchen scraps.
 
What goes in the front of the worm, comes out the back end, a very rich product for your plants.
 
The other counter intuitive is to start a mulch pile in the fall. One would think to mulch in the spring and have the warm weather help with the process.
 
The problem is that the leaves are still on the trees and the spring is when you want to be spreading the mulch as a nutritious plant ground cover.  

Leaf Mulch

Leaf Mulch

Just an inch or two is all it takes to help hold moisture for your plants and simultaneously release nutrients to feed them.
 
Once the mulch pile starts to break down, the temperature will rise internally and help keep the process going.
 
Be sure to keep the mulch pile from drying out by adding water at least once a week. Unless you are getting a lot of rain, then rotate with a pitch fork.
 
These types of mulching systems are open, where the material is on the ground in a pile. It is easy to access for watering and rotating, but neighbors may not be too keen on the looks. If you rotate the pile, you should not have any smells.
 
The next type of system is open-contained. The containment may be a wire mesh, stacked blocks or, something commercially obtained (which is generally plastic and has interlocking walls).
 
They all will work, it just depends on what you want to invest in.
 
Another system is contained but unsealed. This way oxygen can still be used in the decomposition process.  The most commonly used product are barrels that open to add materials and which can be rotated to mix content.
 
These barrels are normally pretty small and are not that easy to extract the materials from. So, I generally use the open system. I have a decently large yard, and the designated space to mulch is not very noticeable. Mulching in a spot surrounded by trees helps, as well.

Composter

Composter

If you prefer a more manicured yard, you may want to look at the contained systems to build or purchase.
 
Hopefully now you see why it is a good idea to keep those leaves instead or sending them to the landfill.

Now is the time to collect your leaf gold for your plants!


Check It Out!

Using Coffee Grounds:

• 10 to 20 percent of total compost volume
have been reported as optimal for compost quality and
effectiveness, while over 30 percent can be detrimental.
 
• Only small amounts of coffee grounds are required for
effective disease suppression. Therefore, I recommend
using no more than 20% by volume of coffee grounds in a compost pile. A diverse feed stock will ensure a diversity of microorganisms.
 
• Don’t assume coffee grounds will make an acidic compost; pH levels will undoubtedly change over time.

Linda Chalker-Scott, Ph.D.


Quick Tip

Mike hosts the nationally syndicated public radio show You Bet Your Garden, which airs every Saturday at 11am on WHYY-FM (90.9) in Philadelphia. “You Bet Your Garden” is also the name of Mike’s column in the quarterly gardening publication Greenprints, appearing in every issue since

Everything You Know About Composting is Wrong: Mike McGrath at TEDxPhoenixville 17:21


Bibliography:

“Leaf Mold, Mulch and Compost | Planet Natural.” Planet Natural RSS. N.p., 04 Dec. 2012. Web. 21 Sept. 2015.

“US Composting Council Announces the 2016 International Compost Awareness Week Poster Contest – Call for Entries for Poster Design.”US Composting Council. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Sept. 2015.

“CERTIFIEDCOMPOST.COM.” CERTIFIEDCOMPOST.COM. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Sept. 2015.

“Register for Our E-newsletter.” Cuyahoga County Solid Waste District. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Sept. 2015.
http://cuyahogaswd.org/pdf_cuyahogaswd/en US/Brochures/backyard_composting.pdf




 

Posted in Magazine Issues, Plants Tagged with: ,

Birthday

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle

Birthday

A big part of Urban Farm Lifestyle is a celebration of family.  I could not resist doing a birthday issue.

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


Family

by David Proctor

UFL Facebook Messenger Channel https://m.me/UrbanFarmLifestyle


October 11, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


Molly and I had moved out from Missouri to Virginia Beach in 1985, as a stop over for contracting work with the phone company.

Our plan was to tour the country and let contracting pay for it. We were young, in our late twenties to early thirties.  Not a bad plan, but the only problem was that I had never seen so much work.

Houses and businesses were going up at a breakneck speed.  The phone company couldn’t hardly keep up so they contracted out most of the work that needed to be done.

Even though we had planned on Virginia Beach being just a stopover, we really liked the area.  We had the ocean, cool Navy jets flying overhead and plenty of work, what else could you ask for…kids?

By this time, we had moved from a hotel along the beach, to a townhouse and now we were in a house.  Molly was building clientele for her business, a franchise of Decorating Den. I had started my own company Proctor Splicing.

Things were very busy, and now, a baby!

Caitlin

Caitlin

Caitlin was born 1989.  Caitlin, being the first born was not spoiled at all.  Well, maybe just a little bit.

Caitlin is going to have her first anniversary in a few days, and is now living on the eastern shore of North Carolina. Her siblings; Kelsey and Carolyn are still in Virginia.

John & Caitlin
John & Caitlin

The rest is history or history being made.

Molly is no longer with us. She died April 16, 2013.  I know she is still with us in spirit and celebrating along with us.

Caitlin is now almost the age her mother was when she was born. 

The circle of life.

Family -053113
Family 2013

Check It Out!

Caitlin's Birthday 2017
Caitlin’s Birthday 2017

Molly's BDay
Molly’s Birthday 2012

Molly's Birthday 2013
Molly’s Birthday 2013


Quick Tip

 

Life is hard, but no one told me it would be this hard.  Enjoy and celebrate every birthday.

 


Bibliography: N/A




 

Posted in Magazine Issues Tagged with: ,

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