I Need Your Help

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle

I Need Your Help

I try to research and write articles that hopefully have some information that you can glean from and better your lifestyle.  Instead of trying to guess where you are at in your life and what your needs are, I would like your advice in what articles you would like to read and that pertain to your individual needs.

David Proctor

 

 
  
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


Your Advice Is Needed

by David Proctor


August 16, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


I know you all are thinking that at least now he finally admits that he needs help.  You may be right but that is not the type of help I am asking for!

I have written about a myriad of topics, from chickens to aquaculture, food labels to poison ivy remedies.  These all pertain to our life but do they answer the problem that is keeping you up at night?

Most articles are about our health and what lifestyle changes can be of benefit to obtaining a healthy regenerative lifestyle.
The choices that we make when we purchase food, and the outcomes to our health from what we eat has always been a great concern.

I have concerns for stewardship of the environment around us.  If we make everyday decisions that keeps our local environment healthy, we in turn will share in that health.

This is why I have come to you for help.  I need advice as to the direction that I can research and provide information that will help serve you and your current situation.  I want to provide information that you need and want to know more about.
Please help me by giving me your advice on the subjects that would benefit you the most in your lifestyle. 

Please provide as much information as you feel that you can with the valuable time that you are taking to help me.  You will be the guide to Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine.

 

Please click on the link to record your response >>>> http://bit.ly/2vHNTyq

 

Thank you so much.

 


Examples

As I get older, I find that it is much easier to gain body fat and specifically I have found that with increased body fat, my lower back can go out without hardly doing anything.  It seems that there is a correlation between body fat around my middle (spare tire) that is adding pressure to my lower back.  I need to know how to strengthen my core, without throwing my back out, and decrease body fat.

I have two bee hives in my backyard.  I have top bar hives and use natural comb.  Each year I have had an infestation of Wax Moths in the hives, which has decimated the hives.  What can I do specifically to reduce the Wax Moths or eliminate the problem without using chemicals that could harm my bees?
 
I have a child that shows symptoms of ADHD.  I am concerned that this behavior will manifest itself in the classroom and other social areas and will cause my child to feel that he needs to close himself off from these settings.  Is their anything that can be done by diet or lifestyle change that can help alleviate these symptoms?

Please click on the link to record your response >>>> http://bit.ly/2vHNTyq

 

Thank you so much.

 




 

Posted in Magazine Issues Tagged with:

Electric Poultry Fence

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle

Electric Poultry Fence

With the movement towards free range chickens, we have to consider how to keep them in one place and keep predators out. This article is Part 1 on using electric poultry fence.

David Proctor

 

 
  
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


Managing Poultry on Pasture With “Electronet”

by Harvey Ussery


August 9, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


This article is copyright by Harvey Ussery at www.themodernhomestead.us

We keepers of the home flock are often advised not to keep our birds all cooped up: “Get ’em out into the fresh air and sunshine!” But we know the local tribe of predators like our poultry as much as we do, so we take care to install a good stout fence around our chicken run to keep out the bad guys.

Now it’s safe to let the flock out into their little corner of the great outdoors. But wait! Within a week every last blade of grass is gone from the run—it looks like the surface of the moon dotted with chicken poops! Droppings are accumulating, flies are having a field day, pathogens are a potential hazard, and the run is a source of run-off pollution with every heavy rain. A static chicken run is not such a good idea!

Much better to release those birds, let ’em free-range like nature intended! Now they’re healthier and more content; and the live foods they forage—green growing plants, wild seeds, earthworms, slugs, and insects—are of a quality we cannot hope to match with anything from a bag. The living pasture sod “digests” the poops laid down—vastly healthier for the flock than the static run (and a boost in fertility for the pasture).

Electric Poultry Fencing
Chickens Inside Electric Fence – Polyface Farm

This is the life for “the natural chicken”! Oh but wait, they’re in the garden! And Mr. Pumphrey’s rose bed! And worst of all, Brer Fox and Mr. Raccoon are having a field day (to say nothing of the neighbors’ dogs)! Free-ranging the flock is a terrible idea!

Is there any way to manage the homestead flock that both gives them access to the many benefits of free-ranging on good pasture, confines them where we want them, and protects them from the bad guys? Fortunately there is: electric net fencing, or electronet.

Net Design
I have only used one design of electric net—the poultry net I buy from Premier Fencing Supply—so I will describe that option. The fence is made by welding together the black plastic string verticals with the white (or yellow) plastic horizontals.

Note that the verticals are for support only—they are not electrified. The twisted plastic strands of the horizontals are intertwined with six almost hair-fine stainless steel wires, which carry the charge. (The very bottom horizontal is black plastic with no wires—obviously it would make no sense to charge a line in contact with the ground.)

At both ends of the net, all the charged wires are twisted together so they share a common charge—thus a break in any given horizontal does not leave that strand dead, and the entire net remains charged. (Note that nets come with a kit to repair breaks in the lines.)

Fencing
Electric Poultry Fencing – Polyface Farm

Interwoven with the fence’s mesh are plastic support posts tipped with metal spikes. One pushes the spikes into the soil to stand the fence in place.

Nets are supplied 164 ft long. Thus a single net will enclose a square about 40 ft on a side, or more than 1600 sq ft. “Half nets” 82 ft long are also available. I have never enclosed a flock in a half net—a 20-ft square is a pretty small plot of ground—but it is convenient when laying out an enclosure to have the option of adding a half net to complete the fence (rather than trying to double up a longer net).

Over the many years I’ve been using electronet, there have been several changes to the basic design—all of them for the better. The “stays” or verticals are now closer together (3 inches), as are the lower horizontals (2 inches apart at chicken or predator level), and the interwoven posts (7-½ ft.—for a tighter, sag-free fence).

At least with the net fencing I get from Premier, one has the option of either 42 or 47 inches high. I have always used the 42-inch. Obviously chickens can fly over a fence that high, but they usually don’t after getting “zapped” by it a time or two. If I do have a rogue flyer, I simply clip a wing to encourage her to stay where she’s put. (The guineas are the only fowl who need radical treatment to prevent flying.

For a persistent flyer, I shear off all flight feathers on both wings—certain to keep them grounded inside the fence.) In some situations the additional 5 inches of height could be a benefit, but remember that the gathered bundle of netting will be heavier and longer as a result—meaning handling will be more difficult.

Energizers
One has many options for energizing the fence. Energizers are available in many sizes and voltages for different fencing needs. Some are powered by batteries—from size D to 9 volt to 12 volt. Some are solar powered. Some plug into household current. I use both the latter two options.

Solar Powered Fence Energizer
Solar Powered Fence Energizer

For free-standing use in a site too remote to serve conveniently from household current, the solar powered energizer is hard to beat. The unit’s controller pulses energy from the solar panel through the fence, while trickle-charging a backup battery. At night, or on heavily clouded days, the controller pulls from the battery to charge the fence.

Grounding for the unit can be as simple as a metal stake driven into the soil which also serves as a bracket to hold the charger; though I’ve always preferred a heavier ground rod driven a little deeper into the soil. A good solar charger with a 12-volt battery can energize several rolls of netting. I have two solar units which I use to charge my more remote nets.

If possible to pull power from household current, however, there are advantages in doing so. An AC energizer provides a “hotter” spark in the system, can power more rolls of netting, and can take more weed load without weakening in deterrent effect. I use an AC charger located in the poultry house, which is wired for electricity, to carry power to a number of pasture nets.

Unless nets are “anchored” on the poultry house, I use insulated cable to carry the charge, and manual field switches to “kill” the charge in order to enter a net. Note that in a system of separate nets served from the same charger, you can wire the manual field switches parallel (nets farther down the line remain charged when the switch is open) or in series (nets down the line also lose power when the switch is open).

Moving Electric Fence
Moving Electric Fence – Polyface Farm

Equally important as the energizer is the quality of electrical ground in the system. The better the ground, the hotter the spark in adverse conditions—e.g., dry soil. For my AC unit, I grounded with three 8-foot steel rods, driven into the soil along the foundation of the poultry house (which stays moist longer than any other location because of run-off from the roof) and wired together with heavy gauge wire. I do not ever have to worry about good ground in that system, however dry the soil becomes in summer.


Check It Out!

 

The Small-Scale Poultry Flock

 


Quick Tip

 

As with anything electrical, grounding is everything.  For the best grounds, drive a full 1/2″ by 8′ ground rod in a moist area.  You may have to cut the ground rod if you live in a rocky area.  Drive more than one and tie them together with ground clamps and bare #6 ground wire.


Bibliography:

©Unless otherwise noted, all material on this site, both text and photos, is copyright by Harvey and Ellen Ussery, 2005 to the present. Individuals may copy and circulate it freely under the following conditions: This site www.TheModernHomestead.US must be attributed as the source; any material copied must include this copyright notice; and no charge may be made if you pass copies on to others, other than the actual costs of copying, if any. No material on this site may be published in any print or electronic media, whether or not for profit, without written permission of Harvey or Ellen Ussery.



 

Posted in Animal Husbandry, Chickens, Magazine Issues Tagged with:

Raising Ducks

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle

 

 

Raising Ducks

Most people think of chickens for the backyard, even though our web-footed friends can produce more eggs for a longer period of time, the male duck doesn’t crow, and they love to eat slugs among other yard pest.  The disadvantages to raising ducks, still trying to find one.

 

 

David Proctor

 

 
  
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


Raising Ducks

by David Proctor


August 2, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


 

Raising any animal in a suburban setting can be challenging.  First you have to see if they are even allowed and if so, do they require a permit.  The next step is to put up a fence so they do not become an easy meal for the neighbor’s dog.  But once these issues are taken care of, the rest is not hard. 

Ducks do not require nesting boxes, they do not roost, and the male duck doesn’t crow.  They still quack, and some breeds are noisier than others, but are generally not that loud.
Ducks are social, so you should look at having at least two. Some companies won’t send fewer that two or three when they ship them.  They do live for 7+ years so keep that in mind. The laying duck needs about three square feet of floor space per duck.

To keep the ducks corralled, it is best to put up a poultry fence that is 4’ high and depending on how many ducks, will determine the area to fence off.  If you have a big enough yard, then you may want to confine how much room you fence off and move them on a regular basis.  This will allow the grass to grow back and the ducks to have an area that is not barren and has a fresh supply of bugs.

To figure out which breed of duck that you get will depend on what you want from the duck.  If the need is just for eggs then the Khaki Campbell, Silver Appleyard or Welsh Harlequin do well.  Individual females have been known to produce 360 or more eggs in a year’s time, although flock averages are nearer to 275 to 325. Good foragers include Ancona, Cayuga Runner or Magpie ducks.  They are all super active and will be best for weed and bug control. 

Duck eggs come in a few colors; white, cream, pale green or black.  Not the best for Easter egg baskets. Any breed of duck will lay delicious, rich eggs, and also provide lots of nutrient rich fertilizer in the form of manure.

What about water, is a pond needed? The answer is no.  The ducks would love to have a kiddie pool to play in but this is not required to remain healthy.  They do need about four to six inches of fresh water to dip their heads in and clean their bills and eyes. Both the number and size of eggs will suffer if birds are frequently allowed to go thirsty.

Ducks

Ducks At Polyface Farm

To prevent unsanitary mud holes from developing around the watering area, it’s advantageous to place all watering receptacles on wire-covered platforms or locate them on the outside of the pen where the birds must reach through fencing in order to drink.
Ducks can eat the same feed as what you give chickens. To keep ducks laying the year around, they must be supplied an adequate amount of laying feed that provides a minimum of 15 to 16 percent crude protein.  Do not feed ducks chicken laying rations that are medicated.To reduce waste, pellets are preferred. Fine, powdery feeds should be avoided.  Feed can be left in front of the birds at all times in a trough or hopper feeder, or it can be given twice daily in quantities that the ducks will clean up in 10 to 15 minutes.  The first method insures that the ducks are never deprived of feed, while the second system helps prevent feed loss to rodents and encourages the fowl to forage during the day.To produce mild-flavored eggs, feed containing marine products should not be utilized.  Dr. George Arscott, formerly head of the Oregon State University Poultry Science Department, also urges that cottonseed meal not be used in breeding or laying rations since this protein supplement contains a toxin that can reduce hatchability and produce strange coloration in eggs, especially if the eggs are stored several weeks before being eaten.  You might also want to keep in mind that feed stuffs such as corn and dehydrated or fresh greens cause bright-colored yolks, while wheat, oats and barley result in pale yolks.While producing, ducks are very sensitive to sudden changes in their diets.  To avoid throwing you birds into a premature molt and drastically reducing egg production, it’s wise to never change feeds while ducks are laying.  If the brand or type of feed you’ve been using must be altered, do so gradually, preferably over a span of at least a week or 10 days.
 
With their well-oiled feathers and thick coating of down, ducks are resistant to cold and wet weather.  For ducks in general, a windbreak that is bedded on the protected side with dry litter usually provides sufficient protection in areas where temperatures drop to zero degrees.  For laying ducks, they will do better if they are housed at nighttime.
Ducks Water & Shade
Ducks Water, Shade & Poultry Netting

The duck house can be a simple shed-like structure, approximately three feet tall, and does not require raised nest, perches and dropping pits.  When ducks are housed only at night, a minimum of three to five square feet of floor space per duck is recommended.  If you anticipate keeping your ducks inside continuously during severe weather, providing each bird with eight to fifteen square feet help keep bedding dry and sanitary.

For consistent winter egg production, ducks, like chickens, must be exposed to a minimum of thirteen to fourteen hours of light daily. Day length is extremely important since it is the photoperiod that automatically turns the reproductive organs of poultry on and off.  One 25W clear or white bulb located five to six feet above the floor should do.

To purchase ducks, Metzer Farms sells ducklings.  They are the largest source for ducklings in North America.  They will ship as few as two or three ducklings almost year-round.  You can even find them on Craig’s list.  The nice them about baby ducks or ducklings, is they aren’t susceptible to Coccidiosis like baby chicks are, so they don’t need medicated feed. Ducklings do need a bit more niacin than chicks do.  Add a sprinkle of Brewer’s yeast over their feed and also add some raw rolled oats to cut the protein levels so the ducks don’t grow too fast and have leg problems.

Ducklings will need to be kept in the house, or shed, under a heat lamp for the first 6-8 weeks before they can go outside, so be sure you have a brooder set up that is safe for ducklings before they arrive home.

Even if you get an older duck or rescue duck, they will often lay well for 5-6 years, often several years past your average chicken.  Just remember they are social and it is best to get two and preferably three, as a starter flock.
 
As you can see, I had trouble finding the downside to having ducks.  Ducks produce eggs, keep the bugs down in the yard, are fun to watch and live for a long time with few requirements and sometimes less than most other critters on your urban farm.


Check It Out!

 

 

“No Messy Ducks!” – How to Raise CLEAN Ducks 8:24
Big Pond Farm – The Fit Farmer
Published on Jun 7, 2017


Quick Tip

 

Duck Breeds


Bibliography:

Holderread, Dave. “How to Raise Ducks in Your Backyard | Backyard Poultry.” Countryside Network, Backyard Poultry, 3 Aug. 2017, countrysidenetwork.com/daily/poultry/poultry-poultry/how-to-raise-ducks-in-your-backyard/.

Steele, Lisa. “A Quick Guide to Buying Ducks.” Countryside Network, 9 June 2016, countrysidenetwork.com/daily/poultry/poultry-poultry/a-quick-guide-to-buying-ducks/.

Fontanes, Lori. “A Beginner’s Guide to Keeping Ducks in Suburbia.” Countryside Network, 22 June 2017, countrysidenetwork.com/daily/poultry/poultry-poultry/a_beginners_guide_keeping-ducks_in_suburbia/.

Steele, Lisa. “Common Duck Diseases – Countryside Network .” Countryside Network, 5 June 2017, countrysidenetwork.com/daily/poultry/feed-health/common-duck-diseases/.



Posted in Animal Husbandry, Chickens, Magazine Issues Tagged with: ,

The Last Straw

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle

The Last Straw

Does banning plastic straws really give us the desired intent or just another knee jerk political reaction that falls short?

 

David Proctor

 

 
  
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 


Banning Plastic Straws

by Carolyn Proctor


July 26, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


Carolyn Proctor

Within the past month, Seattle has implemented a ban on the use of plastic utensils, including plastic straws. Violators of this ban on “all food service businesses, including restaurants, grocery stores, delis, coffee shops, food trucks, and institutional cafeterias” will face a $250 fine.

Plastic Straws
Plastic Straws

This promotes businesses to supply their store with utensils made from environmentally friendly or reusable materials (steel, bamboo, paper, etc.) in an effort to reduce marine plastic pollution.

Surface level, this seems like an awesome idea. The world produces 260 million tons of plastic each year and 10% of that ends up in the ocean (Guern, 2018). This pollution has a deadly effect on marine wildlife whether it is being ingested, entrapping the animal, or is lodged in an orifice.

It affects nearly 300 different species, with some of the most worrisome being the Hawaiian monk seals (1,100 left in the wild) and Pacific loggerhead sea turtles (200,000 left in the wild). So of course, we want to minimize pollution in order to eradicate marine life pollution.

Well, there are quite a few ethical drawbacks to this widely spreading ban on plastic utensils. The seemingly least necessary utensil is plastic straws. Many restaurants and stores are halting the use of straws in their businesses. Starbucks has famously released their new “strawless lid,” which sounds pretty amazing after seeing photos of a plastic straw being lodged in a sea turtle’s nose, right?

Turtle With Straw Up Nose
Turtle With Straw Up Nose

No. The new lid is made of MUCH more plastic- one researcher found that it adds 0.32-0.88 g more plastic per drink depending on the size ordered (Britschgi, 2018). The issue of marine plastic pollution is measured by weight, so this is blatantly exacerbating the problem. I personally think that it would be much more advantageous for Starbucks to start with constituting recycling bins in every location.

This also creates an enormous barrier on the disabled community. A variety of disabilities require the use of straws to safely drink and this ban is manifesting an unnecessary hurdle for the disabled community. Many non-disabled (and unempathetic) people have suggested that those requiring a straw bring their own reusable one, such as silicone or steel, which is absurd.

Carrying around reusable straws with you is an amazing way to limit your own carbon footprint, but it should not be a responsibility forced onto the disabled population. A disabled person should not be expected to carry around a straw with him/her everywhere just in order to eat and drink freely (Wong, 2018).

Starbucks’ strawless lid is unethical and harmful to not only the environment, but also their own consumers.
The most basic ideology of the ban has the right direction- we need to use less plastic. However, there are SO many other, effective ways to do this. We all need to start with ourselves before we jump to legislation without consideration for the damage it could cause people.

Starbucks Strawless Lid
Starbucks Strawless Lid

Reduce, reuse, recycle is probably one of the most important things we all learned in primary school. There is no reason that every person and business should not practice recycling. Limit your own plastic use at home by trying reusable grocery bags, reusable hot/cold drinking cups/straws (there’s a discount at Starbucks for bringing your own cup!!!), biodegradable dog waste bags, reusable K-cups, and in a plethora of other ways.

The internet is full of ideas and methods to lessen your carbon footprint; do your research (one of my favorite searches on Pinterest is “waste free living”).  Acknowledge the waste your releasing into our environment and better yourself.

Overall, YES there is a plastic epidemic and we are creating irreversible damage to the environment. NO, the ban on plastic straws is not the end all solution to fix this; personal accountability will be.


Check It Out!

 

Reuse

Reuse


Quick Tip

Single Use

Single Use


Bibliography:

Britschgi, C. (2018, July 12). Starbucks Bans Plastic Straws, Winds Up Using More Plastic. Retrieved from
https://reason.com/blog/2018/07/12/starbucks-straw-ban-will-see-the-company
Guern, C. L. (2018, March). When The Mermaids Cry: The Great Plastic Tide. Retrieved from
http://plastic-pollution.org/
Wong, A. (2018, July 19). Banning Plastic Straws Is a Huge Burden on Disabled People. Retrieved from
https://www.eater.com/2018/7/19/17586742/plastic-straw-ban-disabilities



 

Posted in fish, Health, Magazine Issues Tagged with: ,

3D Ocean Farming

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle

3D Ocean Farming

Ocean farming could be the next big thing in aquaculture; improving the water, transforming workers from fisheries into restoring our waters and fueling our country, feeding our nation and fighting climate change.

David Proctor

 

 
  
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


3D Vertical Ocean Farming

by David Proctor


July 19, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


Author Emily Gertz,
“Bren Smith wants to create thousands of decent jobs, transform how we harvest food from the oceans, and blunt the effects of climate change and marine degradation — all at the same time. His big idea: small-scale marine farms.

As a fisherman in Newfoundland, Bren Smith (TEDxBermuda Talk: The least deadliest catch) saw his livelihood vanish when the Atlantic seaboard’s cod stocks collapsed in the 1990s after years of overfishing. He managed to make a successful transition into shellfish farming in the Long Island Sound — until he was all but ruined again when powerful hurricanes demolished his oyster crops two years in a row. “What I realized then was, this isn’t a slow lobster boil of climate change,” Smith says. “We’re on the front lines of a crisis.”

Traditional methods of fishing or aquaculture won’t work under current conditions — we need a 21st-century strategy. Like other oyster farmers, Smith had raised his shellfish in cages on the seafloor. However, Hurricane Irene in 2011 and Hurricane Sandy in 2012 both kicked up massive amounts of marine sediment that smothered 90 percent of his harvest.

He realized he had to diversify his farming and raise multiple marine species including seaweeds, for which he knew there was a rising demand. With no experience in sea greens, Smith tapped the expertise of University of Connecticut marine scientist Charles Yarish. Yarish has researched seaweeds for decades and advocates cultivating them for food as well as for ocean remediation.

But raising different crops wasn’t enough — Smith had to re-design ocean farming, too. He wondered: What if we could take a vertical approach to aquaculture? He calls his technique “3D ocean farming.” It consists of horizontal ropes on the water’s surface, anchored to hurricane-proof floats, that connect to lines underwater supporting seaweed crops and interspersed with hanging net enclosures to grow scallops and mussels.

Clam and oyster cages, also connected to the surface ropes, sit on the seafloor. This kind of farm is barely visible from the shore, Smith notes. His Thimble Island Ocean Farm, which occupies 40 acres of the Long Island Sound, raises two types of seaweed, mussels, oysters and scallops. The farm provides significant non-edible benefits as well: it serves as a storm-surge protector and as a habitat for marine wildlife.”

Illustration by Stephanie Stroud

Illustration by Stephanie Stroud

“Seaweed farming can offset some of the serious problems facing the oceans. Unlike land-based crops, seaweed is what Smith calls “zero-input food” — it requires no additional fresh water, fertilizer, pesticides, feed or soil to grow. It receives everything it needs from the sun and the sea.

It grows super-fast — sugar kelp, one of the varieties farmed by Smith, can grow an inch or more a day. Seaweed improves the marine environment by absorbing dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus, two pollutants that wind up in the ocean via agricultural runoff, and carbon dioxide, which drives ocean acidification and global warming. (Oysters are another good nitrogen remover.) Packed with protein, vitamin C and calcium, seaweed is a nutritious addition to human diets. Finally, it can be used as a potent soil fertilizer and as animal feed.

A new kind of aquaculture needs a new workforce. In 2013, Smith established the nonprofit organization GreenWave to train new seaweed farmers and provide them with two years of support. (The 3D ocean farming model itself is open-source — anyone can use or build on it for free.) With about $30,000, a boat and a lease (which requires approvals from state regulators and the US Army Corps of Engineers) to farm 20 acres of near-shore seafloor, anyone can start a 3D ocean farm that produces 10 to 30 tons of kelp and 250,000 shellfish per acre in five months, according to Smith.

GreenWave also supports research and development of consumer and industrial products derived from seaweed and collaborates with chefs to create appealing kelp dishes. Humans currently consume just a fraction of the 10,000 edible marine plants, points out Smith, so the potential for discovering new crops and flavors is huge.

Smith has also set up a parallel for-profit enterprise, which provides a market for seaweed crops and operates a commercial processing and distribution facility in New Haven, Connecticut. It promises to purchase 80 percent of seaweed harvests at triple the market rate from GreenWave farmers during their first five years in business. “Farmers know they can sell what they grow,” Smith says, “and that’s a real incentive to start farms.” Someday, he imagines, we could have a thriving surf-and-turf economy made up of many small seaweed-and-shellfish farms along the coasts that drive land-based employment.

Smith’s vision for ocean farming is spreading. So far, GreenWave’s program has resulted in 10 people who are tending seaweed farms, with another 25 in training. In 2015, GreenWave’s 3D ocean farming model won the Buckminster Fuller Institute’s Fuller Challenge, an ecological design prize that recognizes innovative and comprehensive approaches to solving the problems created by marine degradation and climate change.

Smith is now preparing to pilot the 3D ocean farming method in the United Kingdom. “I thought it was going to take me 20 years to develop the market on this, and actually the real challenging thing has been building the infrastructure,” he says. “We need more farms. We have standing orders for about 500,000 pounds of kelp a year, and we can’t meet them all.” “

Being on the east coast, this article caught my eye.  It makes you wonder about how this simple restorative means of aquaculture could really transform our agriculture.


Check It Out!

Vertical ocean farming – the least deadliest catch | Bren Smith | TEDxBermuda  15:18


Quick Tip

Top 7 Kelp Benefits

Top 7 Kelp Benefits


Bibliography:

Gertz, Emily. “Vertical Ocean Farms That Can Feed Us and Help Our Seas.” Ideas.ted.com, Ideas.ted.com, 31 July 2017, ideas.ted.com/vertical-ocean-farms-that-can-feed-us-and-help-our-seas/.



 

Posted in fish, Health, Magazine Issues, Plants Tagged with: ,

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