Seed Sovereignty

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle 

Seed Sovereignty

The ability to save seeds, even heirloom varieties is being threatened by recent mergers of Bayer/Monsanto, ChemChina/Syngenta, and Dow/DuPont. We have gone from six to three companies owning the worlds seeds.

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 


Restoring Our Seed Commons

by David Proctor


February 7, 2019

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


These mergers have put in the hands of international corporations the intellectual property rights (IPR) of our seeds.

Few people realize or even care that when we buy seeds, many have “bag tags”, or not even have a notice that states we can only use the seeds for one season.

One would think, so what, I will just buy more next year!  And that is the whole idea behind it.  Not only can we not keep the seeds of our favorite varieties but we in essence rent the seeds for one season.

We lose the regionality of seeds that are adapted to grow in our area.

 

Southern Exposure Seed Exchange

                                                                                                                                             Southern Exposure Seed Exchange

Many think about what they would do if the “Apocalypse” happened. They would go into their shelters and have their canned goods, and ammunition in place waiting for the end so they would be a survivor.

I’m not one of the ones that thinks in these terms, but I don’t like someone telling me what I can and can’t do when it comes to my food!

You will not survive very long without seeds to grow your food.

 

Seed Diversity

Seed Diversity

Few even realize that this right to have our own seeds is being taken away from us. Though most of the varieties are F1 hybrids, some are even limiting open pollination, even heirloom is being restricted.

This means that if you save seeds that have restrictions, you could potentially have legal problems and be sued.
 
“The Open Source Seed Initiative (OSSI) has identified four seed freedoms:

  1. The freedom to save and grow seed for replanting or for any other purpose.
  2. The freedom to share, trade and sell seed to others.
  3. The freedom to trial and study seeds and to share and publish information about them.
  4. The freedom to select or to adapt seeds, to make crosses, or to use them to breed new lines and varieties.

 
Without control of our seeds, we have lost control of our food. Since the first seed was planted, we have always had control, if that is taken away, the stability of our food source is taken away.

When seed varieties are eliminated due to monetary values, we lose a very important biodiversity in agriculture. This makes us much more vulnerable to droughts and other climate changes that may come our way.

 

Assortment

Assortment

Some people have noticed that large funds have been setup to fight this “Seed Democracy” idea.  That the advocates of seed democracy are somehow “anti-science”.

This does not matter though; what matters is that we try to save some of our own regional adapted seeds for our own use and to be passed to future generations.

If you would like to learn about how to save seeds, go to Bill McDorman Seed School and Seed Teacher Training at rockymountainseeds.org


Check It Out!

Jan 22 S2E1 Gypsy Queens – Free The Seed! Podcast 39:37


Quick Tip

Seed Business Directory

Seed Business Directory (click on map)


Bibliography:

Lawn, CR. “Restoring Our Seed Commons.” Acres USA, Jan. 2019, pp. 12–22.




Posted in Health, Magazine Issues, Plants Tagged with: ,

The Why!

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle 

The Why!

Why would I write about a healthy regenerative lifestyle? The reason why…

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


The Reason Why!

by David Proctor


January 31, 2019

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


Why would I write about a healthy regenerative lifestyle? The reason why isn’t because of my lifestyle. I never lived that healthy of a lifestyle until a few years after Molly died.

I saw the effects and results of ignoring the food labels, not caring enough about one’s self to stop habits that would and could shorten life.

I saw the profiles of our young children change due to, in large part what they were eating and the drugs being administered to them to control behavior.

I decided it was time to at least bring about a discussion of our food, our lifestyle, and our health and how these elements have an affect on our quality of life.

The best way to explain this is from the home page of Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine

WARNING: ASK YOUR DOCTOR IF EATING NATURAL FOOD AND EXERCISE IS RIGHT FOR YOU!

Side effects: Weight loss, Lower Blood Pressure, Easing of Back And Joint Pain, Reoccurrence of Sleeping Through The Night, Increased Risk of Energy And Attention Span, Possible Build Up of Naturally Occurring Immunities, Lowering of Bad Cholesterol, Clear Skin, Less Stress And Headaches.  Some Followers Have Even Experienced A Slower Aging Process And Increased Tolerance For Spouse.

Sustainable green farming lifestyle in a rural or urban setting is a pursuit of traditional, healthy, and nutritious agricultural life.

Chick

 

This pursuit is about the benefits of eating fresh food and knowing what is in that food. 

Learning how to eliminate, or at least cut back on, preservatives, food coloring, and flavor additives (the biggest ones are sugar, fat, and salt).

This approach is about learning to reduce consumption of plants and or meat that is genetically modified, given growth hormones, or livestock that has been treated with proactive vaccinations.

Small changes can have positive long-term benefits like a lowered risk for high blood pressure, obesity, vaccine resistance, and other ailments that are symptoms of these causes.

This is a site that pulls together a community of concerned parents that are looking for a change that will be apparent in themselves, their children, and other family members.

Like-minded individuals who want to change the manifestation of illnesses by reducing exposure to harmful elements in our drinking water and food chain, which come with a laundry list of unwanted side effects.

We recognize the huge responsibility that has been placed on our agricultural community to produce as much as possible for the least cost to the consumer. 

We need to appreciate our farming community and their never-ending hard work. Also, we must insist that the bottom dollar not take precedence over quality.

To do this, we need to understand that the farmer has to charge more money for naturally grown foods.

Organic and sustainable practices will prove to be the less expensive route when our quality of life is increased by our bodies’ acclimation to a less toxic lifestyle.

 

 

From The Garden

From The Garden

Our bodies will then start to function as they were meant to, cultivating better health and immunity.

That is why I continue to write about these topics.  I am not an expert. 

Though, this does give me a chance to research, to find out what are the changes and trends in agriculture.

We are at the end of the first month of 2019.  Arctic air is blowing down and parts of the country are in a deep freeze.  Now is the time to start planning this year’s garden.
 
Pull out that seed catalog and look at the pictures that are shown of the green beans, tomatoes, corn, radishes, now aren’t your starting to fill a little warmer?

 

Southern Exposure Seed Exchange

Seed Catalog

We need to think about preparing for our chickens, our bees, our compost worms, if we don’t already have them.  Winter is short time allowed for this prep work that needs to be done.

Bailey's Backyard Chickens 2015

Bailey’s Backyard Chickens 

Yes, I know it is hard to think about these things when you look outside and see that you need to shovel snow.  I just hope these are warming thoughts.
 
Think about how good it will feel to get your hands back in the dirt and to be shoveling dirt instead of snow!

This is why I write about the Urban Farm Lifestyle and having a healthy, regenerative lifestyle.  To learn about, enjoy, and share what is in our own backyard.


Check It Out!

 

How to control hive beetles with chickens, see below!

Barnyard Bees
Published on Aug 5, 2017 4:10


Quick Tip

 

  1. Get your seed orders in if you have not already
  2. Place your bee package order in for spring pickup (bee classes start next week)
  3. Place order for chicks

Bibliography:
N/A




 

Posted in Apiary, Chickens, Health, Magazine Issues Tagged with: , ,

Is Hydroponic – Organic?

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle 

Is Hydroponic – Organic?

The debate continues on whether fruits or vegetables grown hydroponically instead of in soil, should be allowed the organic label? The USDA says yes!

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


Is Hydroponically Grown, Organic?

by David Proctor


January 24, 2019

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


The occupations of many small farmers rely on being able to get a higher price for a superior product.
 
Hydroponics is a system that allows plant nutrients to be accessed by the plant through water that the plant is in. No soil is involved with the transition of nutrients to the plant.  It is a very effective system, uses less water than soil-based agriculture and allows plants to be grown inside without a lot of land, without most pest and competing weeds.

 

Hydroponic Greenhouse

Hydroponic Greenhouse

I really enjoy having fruit and vegetables that are out of season but I do not think that substantially more should be paid for a product that doesn’t live up to the same quality as organic.

You have to keep in mind that a hydroponic system feeds the plant.  Organic feeds the soil that feeds the plant.

I never really thought too much about whether hydroponically grown fruit or vegetables was organic or not.  Until I started patronizing the organic aisle and paying a premium for the produce, meat, and dairy.  You think you are getting a product that is either grown in the soil or is eating what has been grown in the soil organically.

Monticello

Monticello

So, what is organic and who puts that label on things that we pay more for?  Organic labels are placed by inspectors who are controlled by the USDA National Organics Program (NOP), United States Department of Agriculture.  The USDA takes into account guidelines established by the National Organics Standards Board (NOSB).

In 1995 Organic was defined by the NOSB as “an ecological production management system that promotes and enhances biodiversity, biological cycles, and soil biological activity. It is based on minimal use of off-farm inputs and on management practices that restore, maintain, and enhance ecological harmony”

Soilless environments weren’t really being considered as organic nor did the rest of the world consider hydroponics as organic.  Everything went along well until the popularity of eating healthy and eating organic started to take off.

When money is involved, things start to change quickly.  Other countries started to import their products to the US since they could get a better price with their hydroponically grown produce and being able to use the organic label that other countries would not allow.  Mexico, Canada and Holland all import tomatoes, peppers, berries, lettuce and other fruits and vegetables as organic in this country, but can’t sell as organic in their own country, because they are hydroponically grown!

Don’t get me wrong, I love hydroponics.  Hydroponics was the key element in my farm plan to feed my animals.  But I never considered that I would call that organic. 

How often do you see in the organic aisle the label hydroponically grown organic?  I am not against the hydroponic industry nor am I here to demonize the hydroponic growers.  The problem is the USDA has not lived up to maintaining the standards of organic and has been allowing these growers to be certified because of money and influence.

Grown In Soil

Grown In Soil

In fact, I have used a hydroponics system for growing my jalapeno plants.
 
As I said before, do we feed the plant or feed the soil.  The most natural way and the healthiest way is to feed the soil that feeds the plant.  If you think that soil is inert and is just there to support the plant, till we feed it with Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium, then you may not get this article at all or wonder what the big deal is.
 
The true test is in your taste buds.  During the seasonal time of year for locally grown fruits and vegetables, try tasting a true organic against a hydroponically grown and see if you can tell any difference.

Fruit & Vegetables

Fruit & Vegetables

How many wines have you bought that said they were made from grapes grown hydroponically?

Samuel Adams advertises that they make their beer from hops that are grown at one location in Germany. The soil on this farm, provides the taste that is found with the Hallertau Mittlefruh hop.

The debate goes on. If you want a say in it, I would normally say you can vote with your dollars, but if you don’t know what you’re buying because the labels don’t tell you what you are really purchasing then that process is hardly effective.
 
If you want to help send a message you can contact, you state and local representative or you could even sign a petition to keep the soil in organic.

http://www.keepthesoilinorganic.org/sign-petition


Check It Out!

 

What does organic really mean? Everything you ever wanted to know about what it means to be organic.:


Quick Tip

How Does Hydroponics Work?

How Does Hydroponics Work?


Bibliography:

Dixon, Linley, Ph.D. “Is Hydroponics Organic?” Cornucopia Institute. N.p., 11 Mar. 2015. Web. 10 Jan. 2017.

“Should You Buy Hydroponic Vegetables?” Rodale’s Organic Life. N.p., 30 Mar. 2015. Web. 10 Jan. 2017.

“Keep-soil-in-organic.” Keep-soil-in-organic. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Jan. 2017.

Damrosch, Barbara. N.p., 19 Feb. 2014. Web.

“Green City Growers Main Navigation.” Green City Growers. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Jan. 2017.

Dykstra, Jim. “Hallertau: Hop Nobility and Its Bostonian Knight.” The Beer Connoisseur, The Beer Connoisseur, 3 Aug. 2015, beerconnoisseur.com/articles/hallertau-hop-nobility-and-its-bostonian-knight.




Posted in Health, Magazine Issues, Plants Tagged with: ,

Living Soil

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle 

Living Soil

Our soil is one of the most important natural resources that our country has.  To be able to keep this valuable resource, we need to feed the Soil, not the Plant!

 

 

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


Soil Ecology

by David Proctor


January 17, 2019

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


We reap what we sow. 

This applies to our attitude and actions as much as to what is planted.

To be able to maintain our high quality of living, we must manage our soil resources better.  One way to do that is to plant cover crops.

“Living Soil” is a film that documents this subject very well.  This film was produced by Chelsea Myers, founder of Tiny Attic Productions, LLC which is located in Columbia, Missouri.

This film did an outstanding job of documenting the reasons behind our need for paying attention to our soil health and how our agriculture has to be in tune with ecology.
 
Nowhere in nature does monocropping come natural, nature wants diversity.

 

Monocropping

Monocropping

In agriculture, the predominate method of growing crops is to plow the field, then disc the field to break up the dirt and make it level and smooth for planting.

The field is sprayed with herbicides and pesticides so when the seeds are planted and germinate, the seedling will have a chance to grow without competition with weeds nor be eaten by pest.

The fields are fertilized with N-P-K, nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium.  All derived from petroleum.

The crops grow, sometimes with the help of irrigation, then are harvested.  If growing season permits, another crop is planted as the one is harvested, and sometimes a third crop is planted, such as winter wheat. 

Then the process starts all over again in the spring.

Tractor - Seeding

Tractor – Seeding

This process has kept the United States as the leading food producer of the world, but at a huge cost.
We have worn out our soils, have lost huge amounts of soil into our streams and rivers.

A change needs to be made in how our farmers treat the land.  No till planting along with growing cover crops, and utilizing grazing practices, needs to be encouraged throughout agriculture.
 
When the seeds are drilled into the field, little disturbance to the field occurs.

The fields need to have a cover crop growing, that will help keep the soil in place and aerated, so moisture can be absorbed.

Another plus of having a cover crop is nitrogen fixation.

The cover crop is grazed and knocked down by herbivores and the resulting field is ready for the new seed crop to emerge.

The result is a sustainable and a natural symbiotic relationship occurring.  The idea of the “soil is just a container for the plants” has to removed from the thought process.  We must rethink this thought to be; feed the soil, not the plant!

Symbiotic

Symbiotic

This is why, in my opinion, hydroponics will never replace the quality of food that can be grown in the soil.  Hydroponics is not organic, in my opinion.

The reason I believe this, is due to the lack of the symbiotic relationships. This has been removed or at least not as complete, as when plants are grown in the soil with naturally occurring microbes.

The sun and the soil are what gives flavor, and the nutrients to our food. 

We need to protect our soil as if our lives depend on it, because it does, for us and our future generations.

The documentary “Living Soil” is well worth watching!


Check It Out!

 

Living Soil

Living Soil 1:00:22


Quick Tip

 

Dr. Jerry Hatfield

Dr. Jerry Hatfield 1:38


Bibliography:

Wright, Chelsea, director. Living SoilVimeo, Nov. 2018, vimeo.com/298616093.




Posted in Health, Magazine Issues, Plants Tagged with:

Nutritional Yeast

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle 

Nutritional Yeast

I personally prefer to get most of my protein by eating grass fed beef, but….

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 

 


What Is Nutritional Yeast?

by David Proctor


January 10, 2019

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


I personally prefer to get most of my protein by eating grass fed beef, but if you are not into eating meat, or maybe you would like an additional source of nutrition, you should consider nutritional yeast.

 

What is nutritional yeast and how is it different from regular yeast?

 

Dough

Dough

“Nutritional yeast is a highly nutritious vegan food product with various potential health benefits. It can be used to add extra protein, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants to meals. Studies suggest that nutritional yeast may help protect against oxidative damage, lower cholesterol and boost immunity.”  Nov 30, 2017     healthline.com

“Nutritional yeast and active dry yeast are not interchangeable ingredients. …Nutritional yeast is a deactivated yeast that is used, especially by vegans, to thicken sauces and mimic the flavor of Parmesan cheese. Active, dry yeast is an activated yeast usually included in breads to make them rise.” Nutritional Yeast vs. Active Dry | Livestrong.com

Active yeast, known as brewer’s yeast, is used to make bread rise and is used in beer and other foods. 

Bread

Bread

“Nutritional yeast is a species of yeast known as Saccharomyces cerevisiae.” This yeast has been heated and dried so it is no longer active.

Nutritional Yeast

Nutritional Yeast

What makes nutritional yeast good for you, is that it is a good source of protein, fiber, B vitamins, potassium, calcium, iron, zinc, phosphorus, selenium and molybdenum.

Be sure to get non-fortified version so you do not get synthetic vitamins.  About a
teaspoon to a tablespoon a day will add a great amount of nutrition to your diet.

Some suggested ways to consume nutritional yeast, besides just plain eating it is to place on eggs, popcorn, instead of using butter or salt, in risotto, and soups.
 
Nutritional yeast is sometimes considered to be a superfood because of all the high-protein, low-fat, nutrient-dense food that is packed with vitamins and minerals.

If you are looking for a nutrient dense addition to your diet, then you might want to consider nutritional yeast.
Check It Out!


Check It Out!

The Amazing Benefits of Nutritional Yeast  3:10
Dr. Eric Berg DC
Published on Jun 13, 2016


Quick Tip

 

15 Reasons To Love Nutritional Yeast

15 Reasons To Love Nutritional Yeast


Bibliography:

Dresden, Danielle. “Top 5 Nutritional Yeast Benefits and How to Use It.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, Oct. 2018, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323245.php.

Julson, Erica. “Why Is Nutritional Yeast Good for You?” Healthline, Healthline Media, Nov. 2017, www.healthline.com/nutrition/nutritional-yeast.

Cespedes, Andrea. “Nutritional Yeast vs. Active Dry.” LIVESTRONG.COM, Leaf Group, www.livestrong.com/article/537679-nutritional-yeast-vs-active-dry/.




Posted in Health, Magazine Issues Tagged with:

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