Seed Starter

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Sustainable Lifestyle

 

 Seed Starter

If you haven’t planned out your garden for this year or ordered your seeds, that’s alright, now is the time to buy some seeds and get them off to an early start!

 

Enjoy,

 

David Proctor

                                                               

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           

Urban Farmer

Urban Farmer

           From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 


Seed Starter

 

                                    by David Proctor

March 03, 2016

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly

With a few simple techniques, you will be off and running with your preseason planting. Just remember that seeds will need a clean, moist and warm place to start germinating. They also will need to have plenty of light once they have come up. In today’s article I will talk about what to plant this time of year and how to make the seedlings grow.

The Urban Farmer has a list of vegetables that can be started in March and suggestions for what variety to try.

Contributing article from Urban Farmer:
March is the time of year to start tomato and pepper seeds indoors for an early spring planting.  This is also an excellent time to start… READ MORE >>>

What to Plant in March

Now that we have an idea of what type of plants to start growing, I would like to take a look at some basic techniques that will help get the seeds started that you have chosen and keep them growing.

I have read quite a few good articles about various techniques for starting seeds off. Of course, you can always wait to buy young seedlings and just plant them. But to get variety and choices that you may not be able to find at your local seed store, plus the opportunity to get a head start, try planting with these guidelines from Burpee Seeds.

It’s possible to have a fine vegetable garden by buying young plants. But you will have a much wider range of possibilities if you start your own plants from seeds indoors.  Not only is it much cheaper, but you can buy seeds for many more varieties… READ MORE >>>

Heirloom Tomato
Black Krim Heirloom Organic Tomato

As you read this great advice from our contributing editors, please don’t forget to read and share some of my past articles on Cold Frames and Grow Lights.


 

Check It Out!

Planting Calendar

Planting calendar key

Plant Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Beans
Beet
Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts
Cabbage (Summer)
Carrot
Cauliflower
Celery
Corn
Cucumber
Eggplant
Garlic
Kale
Leek
Lettuce
Melon
Okra
Onion
Parsnip
Peas
Pepper
Potatoes (Maincrop)
Pumpkin
Radish
Spinach
Squash (Summer)
Sweet Potato
Swiss Chard
Tomato
Watermelon

– See more at: http://www.almanac.com/gardening/planting-dates/VA/Fredericksburg


 

Quick Tip

How to Start Seeds
  • Fill clean containers with seedling mix. Use soilless peat moss and mix in equal parts vermiculite and perlite to hold enough water and allow oxygen to flow. Don’t use potting soil.
  • Pour soilless mix into a large bucket and moisten with warm water. Fill your containers to just below the rim.
  • Plant your seeds according to your seed packet. Most seeds can simply be gently pressed into the mixture; you can use the eraser end of a pencil to push in seeds. When planting seeds, plant the largest seeds in the package to get the best germination rate.
  • Cover containers with plastic. Prick holes with a toothpick for ventilation. Water as directed.
  • Water newly started seedlings carefully. A pitcher may let the water out too forcefully. A mist sprayer is gentle but can take a long time. Try using a meat-basting syringe, which will dispense the water effectively without causing too much soil disruption.
  • Find a place in the kitchen where there is natural bottom heat—on top of the refrigerator or near the oven. (Move the tray if the oven is on, as it may become too hot.)
  • Seeds sprout best at temperatures of 65 to 75°F (18 to 24°C).
  • When seedlings appear, remove the plastic and move containers into bright light.
  • When the seedlings get their second pair of leaves, prepare individual pots filled with a potting mix with plenty of compost. Move the seedlings carefully to the new pots and water well. Keep pots out of direct sun for a few days.
                                       http://www.almanac.com/content/starting-seeds-indoors

Bibliography:

“What-To-Plant-Now.” Seed Calendar. Urban Farmer, n.d. Web. 01 Mar. 2016.

“How to Start Seeds Indoors – Gardening Tips and Advice at Burpee.com.”How to Start Seeds Indoors – Gardening Tips and Advice at Burpee.com. Burpee, n.d. Web. 01 Mar. 2016.

“Starting Seeds Indoors.” Old Farmer’s Almanac. N.p., n.d. Web. 01 Mar. 2016.


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