How To Make Eucalyptus Oil

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle 

Eucalyptus Oil

If you’re interested in natural living and homeopathic solutions, chances are you’re conscious about the ingredients in the products you choose.  Learn more about making your own Eucalyptus Oil.

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 

 


How To Make Your Own Eucalyptus Oil

by Kelsey Proctor


 October 3, 2019

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


One of the best ways to control what’s in your products, is to make them yourself.

Let me introduce eucalyptus oil; an essential oil derived from the eucalyptus leaf, and used throughout history for medicinal and industrial purposes.

You can make eucalyptus oil yourself by boiling, then straining, the leaves and twigs of the leaf.

Essential oils have become popular because of the increased attention on homeopathic living.

If you don’t want to bother making your own, you can find eucalyptus oil at a drugstore or local health food store.

Eucalyptus oil can be used as an antiseptic for cuts, burns, and bug bites. In fact, dilute the oil with water and spray on as a natural bug repellant.

Eucalyptus oil is not just for medicinal purposes, place a few droplets in a diffuser to destress and improve concentration.

Eucalyptus oil is effective at improving allergies, alleviating respiratory viruses, and reducing inflammation in the lungs.

Eucalyptus oil is one of the active ingredients in the common topical cream Vick’s VapoRub.

However, you can make your own chest decongestant rub with natural ingredients.

You will need:
·         10 drops of eucalyptus oil
·         10 drops of peppermint oil
·         5 drops of preferred essential oil such as lemon or lavender
·         ¼ cup Beeswax
·         ¼ cup coconut oil or olive oil

Directions:
·         Melt Beeswax and coconut oil
·         Remove from heat for 5 minutes
·         Stir in essential oils
·         Cool and pour into desired containers

Continue reading below to learn more ways to utilize eucalyptus oil in your healthy home!


Check It Out!

 

How to Make Eucalyptus Oil

  1. Gather two mason jars
  2. Gather eucalyptus leaves
  3. Pour the oil over the smashed eucalyptus leaves and salt mix
  4. Strain leaves from oil by pouring through a tea strainer or cheesecloth
  5. Label the eucalyptus oil

 

http://www.wikihow.com/Make-Eucalyptus-Oil


Quick Tip

 

10 Uses for Eucalyptus Oil

https://draxe.com/eucalyptus-oil-uses-benefits/


Bibliography:

Ellelmd. “Make Eucalyptus Oil.” WikiHow. N.p., n.d. Web. 03 October 2019.

Kimberly. Kimberly’s Cup. 28 October 2009. Web. 03 October 2019.
Mercola.com. 12 May 2016. Web. 03 October 2019.




Posted in Health, Magazine Issues, Recipes Tagged with:

Healthy Choices

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle 

Healthy Choices

We need to be aware of the risk factors involved in our eating decisions. We will take a look at what we can do to help ourselves and set an example for the younger ones.  September is designated as National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month.

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


Healthy Choices

by David Proctor


 September 26, 2019

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


The latest news on our health is to take action when it pertains to our heart so we do not have the risk factors for high blood pressure. To support this:
 
The National Institute of Health (NIH) presently reports that, for people aged 50 and older with high blood pressure and at least one other risk factor for heart disease, lowering blood pressure to under 120 mm Hg reduced a combined endpoint of heart attack, acute coronary syndrome, heart failure and strokes by 30% more than lowering it to 140 mm Hg.
 
In addition, deaths from any cause were reduced by 25% in those treated to reach a goal of 120 mm Hg.
 
The study’s independent data safety and monitoring board called for the study to be halted because of this significant benefit, which clearly outweighed any harm. (1)
 
I started to work on my health a little late in life.  Fourteen years ago, I started to take steps to reduce my weight, increase my stamina, and lower my blood pressure.
 
My blood pressure was not extremely high but averaged around 125 mm Hg (now: 113/72/70 as an average).
 
After taking small steps to reach these goals, I lost 50 lbs. and have kept it off for over fourteen years now. 
 
I do not diet; I just made small steps in my lifestyle that accomplished the weight loss.
 
I can also say that my blood pressure now averages about 113 mm Hg.
 
This does not take hours of sweating at the gym but a commitment to small, sustainable steps that can prolong life.

 

Blood Pressure

Blood Pressure Chart

 

All this means is that I have lowered my risk.  I do not always eat as I should, or refrain from unhealthy activities, but overall the idea is to keep in a path that gets you where you would like to be and that is to be around for your family and loved ones.
 
This is the whole premise around the urban farm lifestyle, to incorporate a healthy sustainable lifestyle that helps reduce illness and aging effects that diminish our quality of life.
 
Think about the children that are overweight, pre-diabetic and prone to heart disease at an early time of life. This is changeable and doable, it just takes small steps.
 
Step 1: Start measuring your blood pressure on a regular basis. Ignorance is not bliss here.  Try to take it the same time at least weakly or once a month.  I take mine 5 days a week after I work out.
 
Step 2: Measure your waistline. This means more than what you see on the scales, your waistline is an indicator of your health, not your wealth.  Just because you can or cannot afford to eat and drink healthy, should not show up on your waist as a spare tire or food baby.  One of the best tools is a simple tape measure.
 
Step 3: Stay mobile.  You have to move; our bodies are engineered to move.  Do mild stretches, get the kinks out, and move around. You do not have to play rugby, but you need to move.
 
Step 4: Eat less and eat well.  Our plates are too big, get a smaller plate so you do not have to feel guilty about cleaning your plate or eating the portions on it.
 
Eat less and let it hit bottom, wait a few minutes before you think about seconds, then if you want seconds, always take less than the first.
 
Eat well. Eat fresh and try to stay away from processed foods.  The biggest contributor to high blood pressure is our salt (sodium) intake.  Our foods are loaded with salt, sugar, and fat (the bad kink). These are all three ingredients that we need to take control of.
 
Step 5: Try to lower your stress.  Stress can cause many ill effects on the human body.  Take time to do the things you enjoy and put the stressful parts of life in perspective.
 
Reconnect with friends and activities that bring relief from the everyday anxieties that come from work, commuting, and everyday stress.
 
None of these steps are easy. When you look at all the things that pull at our attention, from work to family matters, it is not easy to find the time and energy to change your lifestyle.
 
To put this all in perspective, it is hard to teach an old dog new tricks.  This month of September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month.

BMI Calculator

Click On Image!

Think about the kids. Too many times we see our youth with weight problems.  Stop and think about what you may have on hand in your own home for your children to eat or drink. Think about their activities.
 
I can remember back in high school one of the coaches that I had, Coach Clark.  He was a great inspiration to me. I can remember when he would run races backward as we tried to keep up with him.
 
He would talk about not spending time watching TV, if he even owned one, and would encourage people to spend time outdoors playing sports or other activities.  He is the kind of role model today’s youth need.
 
We have to pick up the slack and be that type of role model.  Whether we think the youth are watching or not, they are. They want their family members, neighbors, and loved ones to be around.
 
So, let’s take the time to watch what we eat, monitor our blood pressure, and be the example that our youth need.  This will help us all to live a more enjoyable, healthy, and sustainable lifestyle.

Macaroni & Cheese Dinner

Macaroni & Cheese Dinner

Do not buy food when hungry.  As you can see from the label above, this was not a good choice on my part.

Eat to live, not live to eat.


Check It Out!

NYC Sodium Shakeup

New York City’s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene passed a rule that requires some restaurants to label menu items that exceed 2,300 milligrams, the daily limit recommended by federal guidelines.
 
For ideal heart health, the American Heart Association recommends consuming no more than 1,500 milligrams per day.
 
Here’s a look at the sodium levels in five New York City favorites!
 
New York Style Pizza: 1 slice = 689 mg 46% of daily max
 
Manhattan Clam Chowder: 1 cup = 690 mg 46% of daily max
 
Pastrami Sandwich: 1 sandwich = 2,750 mg 183% of daily max
 
Bagels: 1 plain bagel = 740 mg 49% of daily max
 
Hot Dogs: 1 plain hot dog, no toppings = 780 mg 52% of daily max
 
New York has been home to several high-profile measures to improve people’s health over the past decade, including efforts to eliminate trans fats in restaurants, calorie labeling, and even a push to ban oversized sugary drinks.
 
Their efforts have paid off, for there are many New Yorkers who are getting healthier!

Quick Tip

 

  • With kids back in school, do your part to help them watch what they eat by
    • Eating Healthily
    •  Brown Bag or Pack their lunch
    • Shop for the snacks that are best for them
    • Before going to a restaurant, check out the menu online to find a healthy one.
    • Watch the school menu and be aware of what your child is eating
    • Reduce salt intake
    • Read and compare nutrition labels
    • Watch out for the salty 6: pizza, bread and rolls, cold cuts and cured meats, savory snacks, sandwiches, and cheese.

    Bibliography:

(1)”Major Hypertension Trial Stopped Early for Positive Benefit with Lower Blood Pressure Control Target.” Major Hypertension Trial Stopped Early for Positive Benefit with Lower Blood Pressure Control Target. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Sept. 2019.

(2) “Understanding Blood Pressure Readings.” Understanding Blood Pressure Readings. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Sept. 2019.

(3) “NYC Salt Shake-Up.” Blog.heart.org. American Heart Association, n.d. Web.

(4) “The Salty Six – Surprising Foods That Add the Most Sodium to Our Diets – Sodium Break Up.” Sodium Break Up. N.p., 07 Oct. 2014. Web. 26 Sept. 2019.
 




 

Posted in Health, Magazine Issues Tagged with: ,

Own Your Seeds

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle 

Own Your Seeds

With the growing season winding down, it is time to think about which varieties you would like to save for next year to plant.  This issue will look at why we go to the trouble to save seeds and the best practices for saving seeds.

 

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 

 


Conserve Biodiversity With Your Seeds

by David Proctor


 September 19, 2019

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


Heirloom Tomato

Heirloom Tomato

When you find a variety that is doing well, you may want to save the seeds so the performance and or attributes can be repeated.  You may also find a need to save the seeds due to the availability of that variety.
 
As our culture tends to plant more mono-crops and utilize fewer variations in the plant world, we are finding that variation is getting harder to come by.
 
You can find a variation with hybrids, but you will not get an exact duplication from the parent.  Heirloom and open-pollinated varieties will provide true-to-type seeds but not hybrids.
 
Heirloom varieties are becoming very hard to come by.  Heirloom varieties provide a historical link to how the food was grown in the past and they provide flavors that are not common in the grocery store and have become popular with chefs and food lovers.
 
An heirloom variety is a plant variety that has a history of being passed down within a family or community, similar to the generational sharing of heirloom jewelry or furniture.
 
An heirloom variety must be open-pollinated, but not all open-pollinated plants are heirlooms.
 
While some companies create an heirloom, labels based on dates (such as a variety that is more than 50 years old), Seed Savers Exchange identifies heirlooms by verifying and documenting the generational history of preserving and passing on the seed. (2)

By choosing open-pollinated and heirloom varieties, you have the ability to help conserve biodiversity and to contribute to the stories behind our seeds.

Sliced Heirloom Tomato

Sliced Heirloom Tomato

In antique stores, we’re drawn to old maple rockers, ornately carved oak mantelpieces or delicately hand-painted china not just because of their form or materials but for the sense of history that clings to them and the way they warm the imagination.
 
They make us wonder about the hands that have held them and the people whose lives they have passed through.
 
That’s true of heirloom plant varieties too. To the gardeners who love them, it matters that ‘Mortgage Lifter’ tomato came from a man who bred his own tomato plants, selling enough of them to pay off his mortgage. 
 
At estate sales, you encounter styles far beyond whatever is the standard fashion today. So, too, heirloom vegetables offer a spectacular range of flavors and shapes.
 
They may be tarter or sweeter, green instead of supermarket red, long instead of the standard oval, ribbed or striped rather than smooth. Often, they have a depth and complexity of flavor you would never find at the grocery store.
 
What is an “heirloom”? The definition is open to dispute. But the term is usually applied to fruit, flower or vegetable varieties that were being grown before World War II.
 
Back then, what we now call “organic gardening,” based on manure and mulch, was standard practice for home gardeners, who accepted risk and variation from weather and disease just as farmers had to.

Heirloom Tomato

Heirloom Tomato

From the 1950s to the 1970s, hybrids dominated the commercial vegetable market, and the older varieties became hard to find until a growing interest in cooking and food sparked a resurgence of the more flavorful heirlooms.
 
Heirloom varieties are open-pollinated–meaning that unlike hybrids, seeds you collect from one year will produce plants with most of the characteristics of the parent plant. And that’s key to their survival.
 
A diversity of choices for the garden is as good a thing as diversity in the gene pool. (1)
===================================
 
Now how to save seeds procedures and background.
 
Harvesting Your Seeds
 
Seeds Benefit From Careful Harvesting and Drying
 
After you’ve given your plants the help they needed to produce healthy seeds, you must harvest and store the seeds properly to keep them healthy until you are ready to plant them.
 
How you treat your seeds during harvest and storage can have a large impact on their viability and vigor when planted.
 
For best results, your seeds should be harvested at the right time, properly cleaned and dried and then stored under conditions favorable to their long-term health.
 
Harvesting and Cleaning Seeds
 
Seed harvesting and cleaning techniques fall into two main categories according to whether the fruits and seeds are dry or wet when mature (actually, a third category exists of seeds which will die if dried out after maturing.
 
Dry Seeds
 
‘Dry’ seeds include beans, okra, peppers, basil and members of the Onion and Carrot Families. Cleaning dry seeds usually involves simply drying and crumbling the pods or husks, then screening or ‘winnowing’ the seeds to separate them from the chaff.
 
Wet Seeds
 
‘Wet’ seeds are found in such plants as tomatoes, eggplants, and many squashes.
 
Cleaning wet seeds require washing to clean the seeds and to separate them from the surrounding pulp.
 
In addition, in some cases, wet seeds (such as tomatoes) are best fermented for several days to remove germination-inhibiting substances from the seed coats.
Ferment Seeds
Ferment Seeds
Fermenting can also help such seeds as members of the Squash family by killing molds, mildews and other disease organisms that may be present on the seeds after growing.
 
Some families (such as the Cucumber family) include some plants that produce wet seeds (e.g., squashes and melons) and others that produce dry seeds (e.g., luffa and hard gourds).
 
See Seed Saving Instructions for Common Vegetables for details on whether a plant makes dry or wet seeds, and whether its seeds must be fermented before cleaning and drying.
 
Cleaning Dry Seeds
 
Harvest dry seeds from their plants when their pods or husks have dried. Some seeds can be picked before they are fully dried on the plants if rains threaten.
 
Other plants, however, (i.e., Mustard family), will not finish ripening once they have been removed from the plant. Leaving seeds on the parent plant to full maturity and dryness is always preferable.
 
Once pods or husks have been harvested, store them in a dry place and wait until they are thoroughly dry. When the pods or husks are dry enough they will easily crumble between your hands.
 
Crumble the pods or husks until all the seeds are released. Then place seeds and chaff in a bowl or box and swirl or shake gently. Most of the larger chaff pieces will rise to the top and can simply be removed by hand.
 
Seeds and finer chaff are easy to separate by a variety of methods. One way is to use two screens of varying mesh, one a little smaller than the seeds and the other a little larger.

 

Dry Seeds
Dry Seeds
The first screen lets anything smaller than the seeds fall through, and the second lets the seeds through and stops anything larger.
 
Another method of separating seeds and chaff is to roll seeds down a gently sloping board, leaving chaff stranded near the top of the board.
 
This simple method works well with round seeds but is basically useless for flat seeds such as squashes.
 
A very ancient method of cleaning seeds is called ‘winnowing.’ In a gentle wind, drop the seed/chaff mixture from a height of several feet into a bucket or onto a sheet or tarp.
 
With a little skill and some cooperation from the wind (a fan in an enclosed space can be used for better control), seeds will fall into the bucket or onto the tarp while chaff blows away to one side.
 
Another, very simple way to winnow small quantities of seeds is to swirl or gently bounce the seeds and their chaff in a shallow bowl while carefully blowing the chaff away with your breath.
 
It’s a good idea to do this over a cloth or newspaper to catch seeds blown out of the bowl with the chaff. These can then be hand-cleaned or planted.
 
Cleaning Wet Seeds
 
Wet seeds are easy to clean, though some need the additional step of fermentation. Seeds which require fermentation should be cleaned after—not before—fermenting.
 
Allow the fruits to fully mature on their plants before harvesting. See Seed Saving Instructions for Common Vegetables for details on how to judge when seeds have fully matured for particular varieties—in many, the fruits will be well past the eating stage.
 
To clean wet seeds, scoop the seeds from the fruit, pulp and all. Pour the seeds and pulp into a large, sloping bowl and add water.
 
Healthy seeds will sink to the bottom of the bowl, while dead seeds and most of the pulp will float. Use your fingers to gently separate all the seeds from the pulp.
 
Then, to remove the pulp and dead seeds, carefully pour the extra water with the floating pulp and dead seeds from the bowl.
Wet Seeds
Wet Seeds
Pour quickly enough for dead seeds and pulp to pour off the top, and slowly enough so that the heavier, good seeds remain safely on the bottom.
 
By repeating this rinsing and pouring process several times, the seeds can be gotten very clean (getting seeds as clean as possible helps to keep them from sticking to whatever surface you dry them on).
 
Drying Wet Seeds After Cleaning
 
To initially dry your seeds after cleaning, drain them of excess moisture in a strainer. Pat the bottom of the strainer with a cloth towel to pull extra water from the seeds after they have drained.
 
 Then spread the seeds on a piece of glass or a shiny ceramic plate to dry (they will stick to paper, even waxed paper).
 
Place the glass or ceramic plate in a cool, dry shady spot for several days.
 
After the seeds are dry, they can be carefully removed from the glass or plate and final-dried before being stored in jars.
 
Treating Seeds for Viability and Disease Control
 
Seeds can transmit diseases from parent plants to succeeding generations, lowering their productivity and even completely preventing them from producing.
 
Simple treatments exist, however, for controlling many seed-borne diseases.
 
Two such treatments available to home gardeners include fermentation and hot water baths, both used on wet seeds.
 
Why Ferment Some Seeds?
 
Fermenting some wet seeds can dramatically improve their ability to sprout.
 
Fermentation removes germination-inhibiting substances from seed coats, makes them more permeable to water, and also helps reduce or control seed-borne diseases (for healthier seedlings).
 
Purposely fermenting wet seeds mimics the natural process of fermentation that occurs when ripe fruits are eaten by animals or drop to the ground and rot.
 
When we intervene to keep seeds from fermenting naturally, it becomes necessary to ferment them artificially so they can complete their natural ripening cycle.
Tomato Seeds
Tomato Seeds
Fermentation is needed for tomato seeds (in order to remove a germination-inhibiting gel), and can also benefit Squash Family and eggplant seeds, though more care must be taken with these to avoid premature sprouting.
 
Ferment Squash Family seeds for only a day-and-a-half or so, eggplants a little longer.
 
How to Ferment Seeds
 
To prepare seeds for fermenting, simply squeeze or scoop the seeds—together with the pulp that surrounds them—into a jar with a little water (about half as much water as seeds and pulp).

There is no need to include more pulp than naturally comes with the seeds.
 
Store this seed/pulp mixture in a warm place (75 to 85º F) for 1½ to 5 days (depending on the seed type and whether conditions are warmer or cooler).
 
Fermentation will be evidenced by bubbling and/or by the formation of white mold on the surface of the mixture.
 
As soon as the bubbling or mold have been evident for a day or so, pour the mix into a bowl and clean according to the directions given earlier in the section Cleaning Wet Seeds.
 
Watch closely, as seeds left fermenting too long (especially above 80º F or so) may germinate, ruining their chances for storage.
 
Once the seeds start to ‘imbibe’ or swell due to taking on water, they will have begun their internal process of germination… by the time their tiny roots have begun to emerge, it is far too late to try and dry them for storage.
 
Sprouted seeds can be planted immediately and grown out (depending on the season), but they will die if they are dried out for storage once they have begun to germinate.
 
The experience will tell you how long you can ferment seeds under your conditions before they begin to sprout.
 
Eggplant and squash seeds germinate more readily than tomatoes, so they should only be fermented for a couple of days or so.
 
Squash seeds, particularly, are quick to germinate—sometimes even sprouting in well-ripened squashes while they are still on the vine!
 
It’s not required to ferment squash or eggplant seeds, though it increases their germination rates and kills some seed-borne diseases.
 
In general, when temperatures are kept between 75 and 80º F or so, fermenting is safe and beneficial and will be safely completed before seeds begin the process of germination.
 
Hot Water Baths
 
Another way to control some seed-borne diseases is to treat seeds for a short time in a hot water bath at high enough temperatures to kill disease pathogens (about 125º F).
 
Treatment times and temperatures are specific to each species, and both must be precisely controlled in order for the treatment to be effective without killing the seeds.

As you can see, there are a lot of ways to save seeds for future plantings.  If you have some plants that you really like, this might be a way to save them for future generations to enjoy.


Check It Out!

 

 

An Introduction to Seed Savers Exchange 2:00
SSEHeritageFarm


Quick Tip

 

How to save squash seed:
 

  • To save seed, allow the fruit to ripen on the vine until the plants begin to die.
  • Choose only the finest specimens with the best varietal characteristics for seed.
  • Harvest the fruit and store in a cool, dry place. Further aging in storage raises seed viability.
  • The seeds may be removed when the fruit is required for cooking.
  • Scrape out the seeds and wash them in a colander to remove the placenta, the stringy flesh surrounding the seeds.
  • Spread the seeds on screens or paper towels to dry. Let them dry 2 to 3 weeks, then store in dated, airtight jars in a cool, dark closet.
  • When properly stored, squash seed will remain viable for about six years. (4)

Bibliography:

(1) “What Is An Heirloom.” Heirloom Vegetable and Flower Gardening Tips and Advice from Burpee.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Aug. 2015.

http://www.burpee.com/heirloom-seeds-and-plants/what-is-an-heirloom-article10162.html

(2) “The Difference between Open-pollinated, Heirloom, and Hybrid Seeds.”RSS. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Aug. 2015.

http://blog.seedsavers.org/blog/open-pollinated-heirloom-and-hybrid-seeds

(3) “Complete, Free Seed-Saving Instructions.” Seed Saving Handbook: Learn How to Save Seeds From Common Garden Vegetables—Free! N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Aug. 2015.
http://howtosaveseeds.com/index.php

http://howtosaveseeds.com/seedprep.php

(4) “Heirloom Pumpkin Varieties and Other Squash.” Mother Earth News. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Aug. 2015.

http://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/heirloom-pumpkin-varieties-zewz1309zpit.aspx




 

Posted in Health, Magazine Issues, Plants Tagged with: , ,

Lactose Intolerance

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle 

Lactose Intolerance

With all the debate about processed food, few have as many strong opinions than the debate about pasteurized milk and what it can or can not do.

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 

 


Can Unpasteurized Milk Relieve Lactose Intolerance?

by David Proctor


 September 12, 2019

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


Milk pasteurization can damage the enzyme lactase, which is required to digest the milk sugar lactose.  If that enzyme is damaged and you do not have lactase already in you, then this can lead to digestive problems,  a condition called lactose intolerance.

When I was very young I can remember being on the farm and watching my grandparents milk the cows.

 

Proctor Farm in Trenton, MO - 1960

Proctor Farm in Trenton, MO – 1960

The milk cows would be lined up outside the barn door anxiously waiting to be milked. They would then come in the barn and go to their stalls or stanchions where a wooden bar would slide over about 15 degrees and a wooden block would be placed to keep the bar next to the cow’s neck and the head secured.

The cows always went to the same stall. Grain would be placed in an area where the cow could eat while the milking process started.  I can remember that the udders would be cleaned and then the milking machine would be strapped on and the process of collecting milk would proceed.

Milk Cows

Milk Cows

The milk would then be poured into a metal milk can. The lid would be hammered on and then the can lifted and placed into the cold water bath that would chill the milk until the milk truck came to collect the cans.

After my grandpa passed away and it was just my grandma doing the milking, she only would milk a cow for herself.  She would go through the same process except she would sit down on a one-legged stool and milk by hand.

She was very good at it and very fast.  She could even aim and squirt milk into a cat’s mouth, which the barn cats loved.

Grandma would take the pail of milk into the farmhouse and place the milk in the refrigerator.  When we had milk to drink with our meals, the metal cups that we drank out of would have the cream globules along the inside of the cups even though grandma had separated the cream from the milk.  The milk was never heated, just chilled and we would drink it.

My mom would tell me that I did not have to drink the milk.  My grandma had always drank the milk and what was good enough for her was definitely good enough for me.

I can remember in high school that I would go through gallons of milk a week.  We always had milk at school, everyone drank milk.

Milk Bottles

Milk Bottles

Times have changed, now instead of milk, it is safer to have soda at school for kids to drink since they may be lactose intolerant.  I’m sure you can still get milk with your meals, I’m just not sure how many choose milk over soda.

But this brings me to my point, is milk the best choice? And if it is, should one choose raw milk (which is not available with school lunches) over pasteurized milk.

Few articles have I researched that have such strong opinions over the pros and cons of a subject as does raw milk.

The FDA and the CDC pretty much state that there is no reason to drink raw milk because of the harm it can potentially do to you.

Yet on the other side of the coin, you can find arguments that state the benefits of raw milk and all the reasons why you should drink it.

Abraham Lincoln - Creator of The USDA

Abraham Lincoln – Creator of The USDA

As you can tell by some of my writings that I believe that natural is better than processed.  In this case, I will let you form your own opinion.

I will start with what the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or CDC and the questions they have with answers on their website then follow with rebuttals

What is raw milk?
CDC:
Raw milk is milk from cows, goats, sheep, or other animals that have not been pasteurized. Although precise data are not available, it is thought that less than 1% of milk sold to consumers in the United States has not been pasteurized.

http://www.realmilk.com/
Weston A. Price Foundation:
“Real milk is milk that comes from pastured cows, that contains all the fat and that has not been processed in any way—it is raw and unhomogenized”

Does pasteurization change milk’s nutritional benefits?
CDC:

No. Many studies have shown that pasteurization does not significantly change the nutritional value of milk and dairy products. All of the nutritional benefits of drinking milk are available from pasteurized milk without the risk of disease that comes with drinking raw milk.

https://draxe.com/raw-milk-benefits/
Dr. AXE:
“Dairy products have gotten a bad rap over the years because of the pasteurization process.  When milk is pasteurized it destroys many of the nutrients that make raw milk beneficial.
According to medical studies the following nutrients that are destroyed or altered during pasteurization include”:

Nutrient and Immune Factors  Pasteurized Milk  Raw Milk
  Vitamin A   35% Reduction   100% Active
  Vitamin C   25 to 77% Reduction   100% Active
  Vitamin E   14% Reduction   100% Active
  Iron   66% Reduction   100% Active
  Zinc   70% Reduction   100% Active
  B-Complex Vitamins   38% Reduction   100% Active
  Calcium   21% Reduction   100% Active
  Enzymes   100% Destroyed   100% Active
  Immunoglobulins   Damaged   100% Active
  Whey Protein   Denatured   100% Active

 
Aren’t raw or natural foods better than processed foods?

CDC:
Many people believe that foods with no or minimal processing are better for their health. Many people also believe that small, local farms are better sources of healthy food. However, some types of processing are needed to protect health.

For example, consumers process raw meat, poultry, and fish for safety by cooking. Similarly, when milk is pasteurized, it is heated just long enough to kill disease-causing germs.

Most nutrients remain after milk is pasteurized. There are many local, small farms that offer pasteurized organic milk and cheese products.

http://www.realmilk.com/
Weston A. Price Foundation:

“It is very difficult to determine the risk of drinking raw milk on a per-serving basis compared to pasteurized milk and to other foods.  For starters, the risk of illness from all dairy foods, raw and pasteurized, is very low compared to other foods—amounting to only 1 percent of all illnesses.

A government document published in 2003 indicates that on a per-serving basis, deli meats are ten times more likely to cause food-borne illness than raw.”
 
Does drinking raw milk prevent or cure any diseases, such as asthma, allergies, heart disease, or cancer?
 
CDC:
No. There are no health benefits from drinking raw milk that cannot be obtained from drinking pasteurized milk that is free of disease-causing bacteria.

The process of pasteurization of milk has never been found to be the cause of chronic diseases, allergies, or developmental or behavioral problems.

https://draxe.com/raw-milk-benefits/
Dr.Axe:
“Probiotics are only found in small amounts in raw milk but when you ferment raw milk to make kefir, yogurt or cheese the good bacteria dramatically increases.  In fact, there are no other foods in the world as high in probiotics as cultured dairy products.

Probiotics are microorganisms that line your gut and support nutrient absorption and protect you from foreign invaders like E. coli and parasites.

The best way to include probiotics in your diet is in their most natural state, which includes raw milk products such as cheese, kefir, and yogurt. Some disorders probiotic-rich foods are known to help with include”:

  • Colon cancer
  • Diarrhea
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Intestinal infections
  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Skin infections
  • Weakened immune system
  • Urinary tract infections
  • Vaginal yeast infections

My farmer’s raw milk is organic, so isn’t it safe?
CDC:
Raw organic milk is not safe. Pasteurized organic milk is available in many places, including supermarkets, farmers’ markets, and dairies.

 http://nourishedkitchen.com/10-reasons-drink-raw-milk/
by Jenny:
“When you purchase pasteurized milk at the store – unless you’re careful about your brand – you’re purchasing it from industrial farms that promote poor health among their herd.

By contrast, raw milk is not produced on a massive, concentrated scale.   Instead, raw milk producers operate small operations with fewer cattle spread out over a larger amount of space.  
Cows aren’t fed on feedlot grain; rather, they’re given space on fresh pasture and spend their time outside with access to shelter when they need it – as in the case of inclement weather.  

By choosing to drink raw milk and eschew pasteurized milk, you’re supporting small, local farmers who value both their customers and their herd.   You’re supporting sustainable agricultural operations, not the dairy mega-industry.”
 
As you can see, a difference in opinion exists.  I am not here to tell you to drink raw milk, that is a decision you have to make or the government probably has already made that decision for you.

If you are thinking about drinking raw milk, then be informed and know the risk.  When I drank raw milk on the farm I had my grandma looking out for my best interest, you will unlikely find that kind of love at the farmer’s market.

“Eating is said to be an agricultural act with political consequences”


Check It Out!

 

State-by-State Review of Raw Milk Laws

 


Quick Tip

 

 

The Weston A. Price Foundation   11:42
Published on Dec 10, 2015


Bibliography:

“Raw Milk Questions and Answers.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 20 Feb. 2015. Web. 9 September 2019. <http://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/rawmilk/raw-milk-questions-and-answers.html>.

“Raw Milk State Laws and Regulations – Real Raw Milk Facts.” Raw Milk State Laws and Regulations – Real Raw Milk Facts. N.p., n.d. Web. 9 September 2019. <http://www.realrawmilkfacts.com/raw-milk-regulations>.

“Raw Milk Benefits Skin, Allergies and Weight Loss – DrAxe.com.” Dr Axe. N.p., 13 Mar. 2014. Web. 9 September 2019. <https://draxe.com/raw-milk-benefits/>.

“10 Reasons to Drink Your Milk Raw.” Nourished Kitchen. N.p., n.d. Web. 9 September 2019. <http://nourishedkitchen.com/10-reasons-drink-raw-milk/>.

https://chriskresser.com/raw-milk-reality-benefits-of-raw-milk/

“Home: THE FACTS ABOUT REAL RAW MILK – A Campaign for Real Milk.”A Campaign for Real Milk. N.p., 01 Jan. 2000. Web. 9 September 2019. <http://www.realmilk.com/>.

“Should You Drink Raw Milk?” Prevention. N.p., 13 Jan. 2015. Web. 9 September 2019. <http://www.prevention.com/food/healthy-eating-tips/risks-and-benefits-raw-milk>.

Walters, Chris, and Joseph Heckman. “Raw Milk For Real Health, Wealth.” Acres U.S.A.com, June 2018, www.acresusa.com/.




 

Posted in Animal Husbandry, Health, Magazine Issues Tagged with:

Kombucha For Beginners

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle 

Kombucha

I first tried Kombucha a couple of years ago when my oldest gave me some she had made. The drink is different but I have grown to really like it. Plus, Kombucha has Probiotics that can be beneficial to you.

 

 

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 

 


Kombucha For Beginners

by David Proctor


 September 5, 2019

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


If you have ever tried Kombucha and have grown to like it; as I have, you may have noticed that the price in the store can seem pretty expensive, $3-$4 a bottle.

I would like to help get you started brewing Kombucha at home.  The process isn’t very hard and you can have all you want and not break the bank.

 

kombucha Tea

kombucha Tea

Before you begin you will need to get a few things such as a starter culture or SCOBY, a few ingredients, and some equipment.

You can purchase the SCOBY dehydrated from a starter kit or even use a bottle of Kombucha from the store to form your own SCOBY, or even better, from someone that is currently brewing Kombucha tea.

  1. The equipment you will need is:
  • Quart size jar
  • Plastic or wooden stirring utensil
  • Tight weave cloth or paper coffee filter
  • Something to secure the cover to the jar (rubber band or canning jar rings)
  1. Ingredients:
    • Unfluoridated, unchlorinated water
    • White Sugar
    • Tea
    • Distilled vinegar
    • Active Kombucha Scoby
  2. Ingredient ratio for one-quart batch:
    • 1 ½ teaspoon loose tea or 2 tea bags
    • ¼ cup of sugar
    • 2-3 cups water
    • ½ cup starter tea or vinegar
  3. Instructions:
  • Combine hot water and sugar in a glass jar, stir till the sugar dissolves.
  • Place loose tea in a metal tea ball or tea bags in the sugar water to steep.
  • Cool to room temperature
  • Remove tea
  • Add starter tea from a previous batch or distilled white vinegar as a substitute
  • Add an active Kombucha SCOBY
  • Cover jar with tight-weave towel or coffee filter
  • Leave undisturbed at a temperature between 68-85 F, out of direct sunlight for 7-30 days or to taste.
  • Pour from top of the jar, keep SCOBY and enough liquid to start another batch

Strawberry Basil Kombucha

Strawberry Basil Kombucha

As you can see, brewing Kombuchas is not really hard, has good health benefits, and can be a very refreshing drink.


Check It Out!

 

 

Homemade Kombucha Tea Tutorial Better than Store Bought! 26:17
Katie Cooks and Crafts


Quick Tip

 

Kombucha can be used for:
1. Dressing and Condiments
2. Meat Marinade
3. Frozen Treats
4. Soaking Grains for making bread, cake, and muffins
5. Acidic Ingredient in Mixed Drinks
6. Hair Care-if too acidic to drink makes good hair rinse

Bibliography:

Christensen, Emma. “How To Make Kombucha Tea at Home.” Kitchn, Apartment Therapy, LLC., 5 June 2019, www.thekitchn.com/how-to-make-kombucha-tea-at-home-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchn-173858.

“Kombucha.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 25 Aug. 2019, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kombucha.

“HOW-TO VIDEO: How to Make Kombucha Tea.” Cultures for Health, 25 Jan. 2019, www.culturesforhealth.com/learn/kombucha/how-to-make-kombucha/

“Cultures For Health.” Cultures for Health, 27 Apr. 2016, www.culturesforhealth.com/learn/kombucha/kombucha-uses/.




 

Posted in Health, Magazine Issues, Recipes Tagged with:

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