Nutritional Yeast

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle 

Nutritional Yeast

I personally prefer to get most of my protein by eating grass fed beef, but….

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 

 


What Is Nutritional Yeast?

by David Proctor


January 10, 2019

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


I personally prefer to get most of my protein by eating grass fed beef, but if you are not into eating meat, or maybe you would like an additional source of nutrition, you should consider nutritional yeast.

 

What is nutritional yeast and how is it different from regular yeast?

 

Dough

Dough

“Nutritional yeast is a highly nutritious vegan food product with various potential health benefits. It can be used to add extra protein, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants to meals. Studies suggest that nutritional yeast may help protect against oxidative damage, lower cholesterol and boost immunity.”  Nov 30, 2017     healthline.com

“Nutritional yeast and active dry yeast are not interchangeable ingredients. …Nutritional yeast is a deactivated yeast that is used, especially by vegans, to thicken sauces and mimic the flavor of Parmesan cheese. Active, dry yeast is an activated yeast usually included in breads to make them rise.” Nutritional Yeast vs. Active Dry | Livestrong.com

Active yeast, known as brewer’s yeast, is used to make bread rise and is used in beer and other foods. 

Bread

Bread

“Nutritional yeast is a species of yeast known as Saccharomyces cerevisiae.” This yeast has been heated and dried so it is no longer active.

Nutritional Yeast

Nutritional Yeast

What makes nutritional yeast good for you, is that it is a good source of protein, fiber, B vitamins, potassium, calcium, iron, zinc, phosphorus, selenium and molybdenum.

Be sure to get non-fortified version so you do not get synthetic vitamins.  About a
teaspoon to a tablespoon a day will add a great amount of nutrition to your diet.

Some suggested ways to consume nutritional yeast, besides just plain eating it is to place on eggs, popcorn, instead of using butter or salt, in risotto, and soups.
 
Nutritional yeast is sometimes considered to be a superfood because of all the high-protein, low-fat, nutrient-dense food that is packed with vitamins and minerals.

If you are looking for a nutrient dense addition to your diet, then you might want to consider nutritional yeast.
Check It Out!


Check It Out!

The Amazing Benefits of Nutritional Yeast  3:10
Dr. Eric Berg DC
Published on Jun 13, 2016


Quick Tip

 

15 Reasons To Love Nutritional Yeast

15 Reasons To Love Nutritional Yeast


Bibliography:

Dresden, Danielle. “Top 5 Nutritional Yeast Benefits and How to Use It.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, Oct. 2018, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323245.php.

Julson, Erica. “Why Is Nutritional Yeast Good for You?” Healthline, Healthline Media, Nov. 2017, www.healthline.com/nutrition/nutritional-yeast.

Cespedes, Andrea. “Nutritional Yeast vs. Active Dry.” LIVESTRONG.COM, Leaf Group, www.livestrong.com/article/537679-nutritional-yeast-vs-active-dry/.




Posted in Health, Magazine Issues Tagged with:

New Year Focus

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle 

New Year

We are now truly focused on what is ahead for us all in 2019… 

 

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


2019 – New Year

by David Proctor


January 3, 2019

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


We are now truly focused on what is ahead for us all in 2019.  We have not seen such low unemployment in decades, the New York Stock Exchange is still in extremely high territory and inflation is still under control.  What is their not to like going into this New Year?

We can focus on political likes and dislikes, and many will.  For a moment, stop and think of where you are at and how lucky we are to be living in the United States.
Life is not easy and also comes with many challenges, but we are a truly blessed country.

Try not to think about what you don’t have, but stop and think about all the things you do have and an abundance of, like the best health care in the world, the best schools, low cost of energy, the list goes on.

That is a look at the macro around us.  The micro is ourselves and what we plan to try and achieve this year.

May I highlight a few ideas that I am working on for myself.

The first positive thing I want to do this year is each day, try and focus on the 80/20 rule (Pareto Principle).  What is the one (20%) positive thing that I can do each day that will supply the (80%) majority of all positive results.

I think the greatest application of this principle is in attitude or frame of mind that we make our decisions in.  A pour attitude can bring on a downward spiral, even in the best of situations.

The second thing I would like to focus on is one thing that I do not feel comfortable doing and that is public speaking.  One of the best things I did in High School was take public speaking.

Microphone
Public Speaking

I am not sure if they even offer that class in today’s schools.  It is difficult for me even after having training in the practice of public speaking, I can only imagine what it is like for the generations that have not had that opportunity.

The third thing I want to achieve this year is to finally have at least one chicken.  I know that sounds a little strange, but I want to have a chicken for eggs and to eventually eat.

Chickens

I would like to have at least one chicken!

The fourth thing I would like to get back into is working out at least one day a week with a trainer.  The trainer I had last year in Greensboro, NC was the best.  Jessica (my trainer) was able to get me to a point of physical well being that I had not been at or may never had been at.

Thor
Thor

The last thing I want to throw onto the list is to finish with reinventing myself.  As you all have read, I wanted to be a farmer/rancher since I was a little kid.

I ended up in the telecommunications field, which has lasted for over 40 years.  About every ten years I have had to reinvent what I did for a living.

Even though I reinvented myself in the telecommunications field, from Installer/Repairman, Cable Splicer, Outside Plant Construction, Central Office Equipment Installation, Engineer, Project Manager to what I am doing today, e-commerce and consulting.

All of these things,I hope to be a means to my ends, and that is to farm. I plan on keeping up with the corporate business that I have had for so many years, but I would like to see more clients be animals rather than people, overtime.

Cattle
And Have At Least One Cow Someday!

So, you have my hopes and ambitions for 2019.  What are yours?


Check It Out!

 

Consulting

New Consulting Web Site


Quick Tip

 

  1. Follow your heart
  2. If you don’t believe in yourself, no one else will
  3. Don’t give up

Bibliography:
N/A




 

Posted in Animal Husbandry, Chickens, Health, Magazine Issues Tagged with:

End of Year

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle 

End of Year

End of Year.  This is when we assess where we have gone this last year and where we think we want to go next year. This issue will highlight a few of the places we have gone this last year and close with where we want to go.

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 


Year End

by David Proctor


December 27, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


This has been a really different year for myself.  A true fork in the road.  I have high hopes for 2019 and the opportunities that are out there.

I hope your last year was a fork in the road for you. We have to keep learning and trying new things, some maybe out of our comfort zone.

One of the articles that I brought to you was on 3D Ocean Farming.  What a fascinating concept, to be able to farm in the open waters! Volume 4 Issue 29

 

3D Ocean Farming

3D Ocean Farming

Another trending concept is taking the farm off the land and into a box! Or as it is call “Farm In A Box”, which is container farming using hydroponics. Volume 4 Issue 6

Farm In A Box

Farm In A Box

Then this brings us to the concept, is or should food that is grown hydroponically be labeled organic? Volume 4 Issue 4

Hydroponic

Hydroponic vs Organic

Not only how we grow our food and label it, we also looked at the food itself, such as raw milk. Volume 4 Issue 23

Raw Milk Laws

Raw Milk Laws

Plus, we looked at the molecular aspects of food = GMO in Volume 4 Issue 10 – Genetically Modified Organism.  When not just natural selection is used to make changes in food, but actual DNA from a like or unlike organism is used to change the natural molecular makeup of the plant or animal.

GMO

GMO

In the end, this is about our health, our family’s health and our community’s health.

Health includes, physical, and emotional, besides what we have ingested.  That is what I have tried to bring to each of the readers.  Do not take for granted the food that you eat, make a point to know where it came from.  Do not take for granted your neighbors and their well-being.  It takes a community to raise a family, and a community to take care of the old.

Remember the past, live in the present, and plan for the future! Have a Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle.


Check It Out!

Virginia Beach

Volume 4 Issue 25 – Trip To The Beach


Quick Tip

 

Super Foods

Volume 4 Issue 45 – Healthy Living Quiz


Bibliography:
N/A




Posted in Health, Magazine Issues, Plants Tagged with: , , , , , ,

Merry Christmas

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle 

Merry Christmas

Take time to be with your family, enjoy the festive moments, and be thankful.

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


Merry Christmas – Virginia Beach Style

by David Proctor


December 20, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


I do not have much that I can give, but I can share some moments we had at Virginia Beach. 

About seven years ago, Molly and I snuck off on New Year’s Eve to go to Virginia Beach to see the Christmas lights along the board walk. 

It is unique in that you can drive on the board walk and you become  part of the parade.  The decorative lights are on both sides and above you as you drive along. 

Molly and I did not drive through the lights that year, but a few years ago, we went down and drove through the lights to celebrate my youngest daughter’s birthday.  

Molly was with us in spirit. 

VABeach

Neptune

Ship

Airplane

Ship_2

Sunken Ship

Crab

Fish

Fish Spray

Castle

Flag

Surfing

Rock Fish

Santa

Santa

12 Days

As you can see by the pictures, this is quite an event to go to.  Each year they change the lights so it is never the same. 

Virginia Beach gets between 25,000 – 30,000 cars that go through the parade of lights each year.

Enjoy and have a Merry Christmas.


Check It Out!

 

Santa

HO HO HO, Have A Merry Christmas


Quick Tip

 

  1. Leave cookies out for Santa
  2. Leave a glass of milk to go with the cookies
  3. Go to bed early so you are not tired on Christmas
  4. Remember what Christmas is really about, Jesus’ Birthday

Bibliography:
N/A




 

Posted in Magazine Issues Tagged with: ,

Coal In The Stocking

Urban Farm Lifestyle

  Healthy Regenerative Lifestyle 

Biochar

Some claim that Biochar is the pathway to carbon sequestration and a way to end global warming.  Others say Biochar is the quickest way to rid ourselves of oxygen on this earth.

David Proctor

 

 
  
 
 
 
From Seed To Fork, Egg To Plate.

    We may not live on a farm, but we can grow where we live.

 

 

 

 


Biochar

by David Proctor


December 13, 2018

Urban Farm Lifestyle Magazine    Published Weekly


When Molly and I lived back in Missouri, we use to supplement the heating system with a wood stove.  We could damper the stove down to where wood would stay burning for many hours.  Was this charcoal or Biochar? Actually both.

We even had a producer of biochar that was one of the biggest employers in Lebanon, MO  The Independent Stave Mill, which produces the chard staves that are used to make whiskey barrels.

Biochar is charcoal produced from plant matter and stored in the soil as a means of removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. It is produced by pyrolysis, which is the burning of organic material at elevated temperatures with the absence of oxygen.

This process of pyrolysis produces organic matter to a carbon state that is stable, some say for a very long time. This is how carbon is sequestered from the atmosphere to a more stable form to be stored in the earth instead of the atmosphere.

When we dampened the stove, the fire was retarded by lack of oxygen but would still burn down to an ash, most of the time.  When biochar was made in the past,  a green plant was burned and covered with soil so that the process smothers the fire but still produces a char.
 
The interest in biochar came about many years ago, from studying the biochar dark earth soils in the Amazon called  terra preta (“dark earth” in Portuguese). 

 It was found that these soils are very productive for microbial life; like mycorrhizal fungi, a symbiotic phosphorus seeking microbe. The soils also helped hold in nutrients for plants due to its porous state.  Other areas without this amendment did not have nearly as desirable soils for plant growth and were more prone to erosion.

 

How Biochar Improves Soil

How Biochar Improves Soil

The porous state of the char allows water to penetrate and be absorbed by the char, thus helping to stabilize the soil.  Biochar will also absorb nutrients from the soil like a sponge, that may be retrieved by plants later.  This is where the other side of the discussion says that this absorptive nature will also absorb and hold oxygen.

Biochar

Biochar

If a great global push was made to create biochar to stop global warming, the opponents say, that we may end up losing our oxygen at such a rate that the earth could be doomed. There are groups that have been pushing for a huge upturn in the use of biochar.

I like the idea of carbon sequestration but have doubts in the human management of the process.  I do not think that biochar is the savior or the demon.  As with most things, it seems moderation of use to be the most pertinent way to use biochar.  I am a firm believer that nature and the natural processes are the most stable and beneficial way to go.

The old saying, “You’ll get coal in your stocking” may be because you have been good instead of bad!

Check It Out!

 

Biochar – the future of sustainable agriculture: Lauren Hale at TEDxUCR   10:33
Published on Dec 14, 2013


Quick Tip

 

Here’s the breakdown:
• Ash and charcoal have many uses in a garden
• Use on rich soil with no deficiencies
• Use to correct acidic soils, or amend the pH of the char before application
• Never use on acid loving plants like blueberries
• Add to compost after composting has finished, not during composting.
• Use in moderation
• Never use char from pressure-treated or painted wood.
• Don’t use petroleum based fire starters or fluids if you intend to reuse the ash.
• Fires started with alcohol or non-paraffin wax are acceptable for garden use.
• Be mindful of your nutrient levels and pH when using char, test regularly for best results.
• Not all char is equal, refuse from wood gasifiers or efficient wood stoves is preferable to that from your campfire, fireplace or grill, but all are acceptable for use given the correct use of your discretion.


Bibliography:

“The Survival Podcast Forum.” Misconceptions about Ash, Charcoal, and “BioChar” The Survival Podcast Forum, 05 Jan. 2011. Web. 29 Nov. 2016.

“What Is Biochar?” What Is Biochar? | International Biochar Initiative. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Nov. 2016.

“Biochar.” Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, n.d. Web. 29 Nov. 2016.

Ho, Dr. Mae-Wan. “Beware the Biochar Initiative – The Permaculture Research Institute.” The Permaculture Research Institute. Permaculturenews.org, 23 Nov. 2016. Web. 29 Nov. 2016.

Tenenbaum, David J. “Biochar: Carbon Mitigation from the Ground Up.” Environmental Health Perspectives. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Feb. 2009. Web. 29 Nov. 2016.

Cox, Jeff. “Biochar.” Rodale’s Organic Life. N.p., 10 Nov. 2015. Web. 05 Dec. 2016.




 

Posted in Magazine Issues, Plants Tagged with:

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